arytenoid

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Related to Arytenoids: corniculate, larynx

arytenoid

 [ar″ĭ-te´noid]
shaped like a jug or pitcher, as the arytenoid cartilage or arytenoid muscle of the larynx.

ar·y·te·noid

(ar'i-tē'noyd), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
[see arytenoideus]

arytenoid

/ar·y·te·noid/ (ar″ĭ-te´noid) shaped like a jug or pitcher, as arytenoid cartilage.

arytenoid

(ăr′ĭ-tē′noid′, ə-rĭt′n-oid′)
n.
1. Either of two small pitcher-shaped cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal cords are attached.
2. A muscle connected to either of these cartilages.
3. Any of several small mucous glands located in front of these cartilages.
adj.
Of or relating to these cartilages or an associated muscle or gland.

ar′y·te·noi′dal adj.

arytenoid

adjective Ladle-shaped.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA]
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.

arytenoid

Ladle-shaped. Pertaining to the two small cartilages attached to the vocal cords at the back of the LARYNX or to the arytenoid muscles of the larynx. From the Greek arutaina , a pitcher or ladle, and eidos , like.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.

arytenoid

shaped like a jug or pitcher, as the arytenoid cartilage.

arytenoid abscess
see laryngeal chondritis.
arytenoid cartilage
one of the paired laryngeal cartilages in the dorsal part of the larynx that provides attachment for the muscles that adduct and abduct the vocal cords. The cartilages form the dorsal boundary of the rima glottis, the vocal cords the ventral boundary.
arytenoid chondritis
inflammation of the arytenoid cartilage that causes a syndrome similar to that caused by recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis.
arytenoid lateralization
a surgical technique used to treat laryngeal paralysis in dogs. One or both arytenoid cartilages are fixed in a lateral position with sutures, thereby enlarging the diameter of the laryngeal lumen.
References in periodicals archive ?
10) The arytenoids and the epiglottis are graded separately on a scale of 0 to 4 points, and the grades are added together.
The base of the tumor was continuous, with an irregular plaque-like white lesion that extended along the vocal process of the arytenoids.
25) They include (1) the inward collapse of the aryepiglottic folds, primarily the cuneiform cartilages, (2) an elongated epiglottis curled on an abnormality, (3) anterior and medial collapsing movements of the arytenoid cartilages, (4) posterior and inferior displacement of the epiglottis, (5) short aryepiglottic folds, and (6) an overly acute angle of the epiglottis.
While a correctly positioned LMA should pose no Risk to the arytenoids, malpositioning of the LMA, as occurred in our case, could potentially cause damage to the arytenoids either directly or indirectly (15).
The various reasons postulated include impingement on the epiglottis, arytenoid cartilage or pyriform fossae.
Axial computed tomography (CT) showed a heterogeneously enhancing soft-tissue mass involving both the false and truevocal folds and extending to the supraglottis, arytenoids, and paraglottic space (figure 1).
The object was visualized on the posterior pharyngeal wall just above the level of the arytenoids.
In addition, the laryngeal mask airway design of the CTrach[TM] is susceptible to epiglottic downfolding and obstruction by the arytenoids (13).
5 mm Hg at the arytenoids, he was quite sensitive to the side of the laryngoscope contacting his epiglottis, resulting in violent coughing.
Once anesthesia was confirmed, two Abraham cannulas passed perorally were used simultaneously to passively move the arytenoids laterally and expose the posterior glottis (figure 3).
This can result in thyroid cartilage fracture, mucosal disruption, edema, arytenoid dislocation, and/or torn laryngeal ligaments.