artificial tears

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ar·ti·fi·cial tears

mixtures of fluid compounds to substitute for naturally produced t's.

artificial tears

a pharmaceutical preparation of various polymers that can be instilled in the eyes of patients suffering from dry eye or keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

artificial tears

A solution containing 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose or 5% polyvinyl alcohol, used to treat dry eye–xerophthalmia, often associated with Sjögren syndrome, which may also be due to sarcoidosis, senile lacrimal gland atrophy, acute or chronic infectious dacryoadenitis–eg, gonococcal and trachoma or tumors–eg, lymphomas, pseudolymphoma, 1º or metastatic carcinoma

artificial tears

Bland solutions designed to maintain the wetness of the cornea in conditions of abnormal dryness from inadequate tear secretion. Methylcellulose is a common ingredient.
References in periodicals archive ?
21, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Allergan plc, (NYSE: AGN), a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the launch of the over-the-counter artificial tear REFRESH OPTIVE[sup.
in dry eye patients with history of active artificial tear use within 30
A primary approach to managing dry eyes is to utilize artificial tear solutions.
With general treatment guidelines in each chapter, information is organized by therapeutic category, such as retinal disease, anti-infective, and anti-inflammatory agents; contact lens care; artificial tear solutions and ocular lubricants; local anesthetics; ophthalmic dyes; and surgical adjuncts.
Mamalis recommends using simple artificial tear drops--not a medication that gets the red out--to prevent dryness.
Eye drops as artificial tear films or drugs which stop the inflammation are then called for.
Artificial tear drops could be used in case there is a problem of eye lubrication.
Refresh Plus is an artificial tear that mimics the soothing properties of natural tears, but is a preservative-free formulation recommended for mild to moderate dry eye.
SOME patients require artificial tear supplements for years after surgery because their tear ducts are damaged during the operation.
Until recently, there were just two treatments for dry eyes: over-the-counter artificial tear eye drops designed to replace your natural tears, or a non-surgical procedure called punctal plugs in which tiny bits of silicon are inserted into the openings on the lower and upper lids where tears drain into the nose.
following this botched surgery Mrs Knight must now apply artificial tear drops in to her eyes every two hours to minimise the pain.