satellite

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satellite

 [sat´ĕ-līt]
1. in genetics, a knob of chromatin connected by a stalk to the short arm of certain chromosomes.
2. a minor, or attendant, lesion situated near a large one.
3. a vein that closely accompanies an artery.
4. exhibiting satellitism.
5. satellite clinic.

sat·el·lite

(sat'ĕ-līt),
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one; for example, a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one.
See also: primite.
2. The posterior member of a pair of gregarine gamonts in syzygy, several of which may be found in some species.
See also: primite.
[L. satelles (sattelit-), attendant]

satellite

/sat·el·lite/ (sat´ĕ-līt″)
1. a vein that closely accompanies an artery, such as the brachial.
2. a minor, or attendant, lesion situated near a larger one.
3. a globoid mass of chromatin attached at the secondary constriction to the ends of the short arms of acrocentric autosomes.
4. exhibiting satellitism.

satellite

(săt′l-īt′)
n.
1. Genetics A short segment of a chromosome separated from the rest by a constriction, typically associated with the formation of a nucleolus.
2. Microbiology A colony of microorganisms whose growth in culture medium is enhanced by certain substances produced by another colony in its proximity.
Referring to one or more lesions, masses, patterns or radiologic densities that surround a central point and have the same pathogenesis and appearance

satellite

adjective Referring to lesions, masses, patterns or radiologic densities that surround a central point. See Minisatellite.

sat·el·lite

(sat'ĕ-līt)
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one, e.g., a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one.
2. The posterior member of a pair of gregarine gamonts in syzygy, several of which may be found in some species.
[L. satelles (sattelit-), attendant]

satellite

1. in genetics, a knob of chromatin connected by a stalk to the short arm of certain chromosomes.
2. a minor, or attendant, lesion situated near a large one.
3. a vein that closely accompanies an artery.
4. exhibiting satellitism.

satellite cell
cells present in nervous and muscle tissue, whose numbers diminish with age, which are involved in repair when damage occurs. They are capable of migration, reorientation, can proliferate, form myoblasts and myotubes, and form long cytoplasmic tails that act as tethers when they migrate.
satellite DNA
References in periodicals archive ?
However, one possible source that the observers could notrule out was satellite glints, momentary reflections of sunlight by rotating artificial satellites.
Revolutionary Camera "COVER: This sketch depicts one of the fast Schmidt-type cameras that will be used for precise photographic tracking of artificial satellites during the International Geophysical Year [July 1957 to December 1958].
Falling space junk isn't rare; about 9,000 artificial satellites and pieces of debris larger than a basketball orbit Earth, and more than 100 of them reenter the atmosphere in an average year.
ON A CLEAR, MOONLESS NIGHT a skygazer may be able to spot dozens of artificial satellites with the unaided eye as they move slowly against the background stars.
EVERY TIME YOU WATCH SATELLITE television or look at a weather-satellite picture, you're making use of a network of artificial satellites hovering approximately 35,900 kilometers (22,300 miles) above the Earth.
Moonwatch, the international satellite tracking network composed of amateurs and other volunteers, was finally disbanded after nearly two decades of operation and some 400,000 observations of approximately 6,000 artificial satellites.
In his role as president of the International Astronomical Union's Commission 50, which deals with light pollution, Sullivan is trying to persuade the United Nations to recognize the night sky as an important part of Earth's environment and to protect it from encroachment by artificial satellites.
As skywatchers well know, many artificial satellites occasionally brighten as seen from the ground.
We discover comets and novae; we keep tabs on supernovae, variable stars, meteors, occultations, and artificial satellites.
24] watts per square meter per hertz) outshines most celestial sources; astronomers can tolerate "minus 238" only because artificial satellites are usually "seen" through telescope sidelobes, which are dozens to hundreds of times less sensitive than the main beam.
Once they are in operation, a new form of Moonwatch will come to life again, this time not looking for artificial satellites but for comets.
Speeding across the skies at up to 28,000 kilometers per hour, artificial satellites are surprisingly visible as they go about their business hundreds, or even thousands, of kilometers above the Earth.