android

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android

 [an´droid]
resembling a human being.

an·dro·mor·phous

(an-drō-mōr'fŭs),
Having a male form or habitus.
Synonym(s): android
[andro- + G. morphē, form]

android

/an·droid/ (an´droid) resembling a man.

android

Etymology: Gk, andros + eidos, form
pertaining to something that is typically masculine, or manlike, such as an android pelvis.

android

1. A non-biological organism having human characteristics. A synthetic person or humanoid robot.
2. Man-like, male-like, as of the pelvis. Compare gynaecoid.

android

resembling a human being.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the artificial person theory was predominant in the early nineteenth century, the idea of not letting business interfere with the public good still remains.
Just like natural persons, artificial persons may be the holders of an amparo action for the protection of the inherent and recognized constitutional rights, such as the right to appear in a court of law, economic rights, freedom of property, the exercise of the action being accomplished by their legal representatives.
As for the possibility of artificial persons to file an amparo suit, it is necessary to specify several aspects.
Insofar as any person is part of more than one artificial person.
The framework will allow any artificial person that encapsulates these traits to participate in the dialogue.
Artificial persons can be "represented" or "personated" by more than one person, leaving room for equality between male and female rulers who govern jointly.
Central to Ethics of an Artificial Person is an extended critique of "role theory".
Similarly, Prince distinguished artificial persons from natural persons on grounds that the former violate the nomological regularities that underlie the concept person.
Artificial persons under the artificial entity theory, such as corporations and potentially the unborn, can have whatever rights given to them by the state, rights which can be taken away just as easily.
If, in the end, our value to God is not based on anything intrinsic to us, then the fear that artificial persons might somehow undermine our value as humans really represents a fundamental misunderstanding of biblical teaching.
A more realistic and equally important prospective contributor would have been Leeds Barroll, whose Artificial Persons recast the question of character at a crucial turning point in both Anglo-American criticism and Shakespeare studies.
The problem at work here is that the actions of artificial persons, their moral features, and how individual persons involved in them ought to be regarded in some moral sense seem to differ from that which usually prevails when we think about the responsibilities of persons acting in some private, non-institutional capacity.