angiogenesis

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angiogenesis

 [an″je-o-jen´ĕ-sis]
1. development of blood vessels in the embryo.
2. any formation of new blood vessels; see also neovascularization (def. 2) and revascularization. Called also angiopoiesis and vasculogenesis. adj., adj angiogenic.
tumor angiogenesis the induction of the growth of blood vessels from surrounding tissue into a tumor by a diffusible protein factor released by the tumor cells.

an·gi·o·gen·e·sis

(an'jē-ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
Development of new blood vessels.
Synonym(s): arteriogenesis
[angio- + G. genesis, production]

angiogenesis

/an·gio·gen·e·sis/ (-jen´ĕ-sis) vasculogenesis; development of blood vessels either in the embryo or in the form of neovascularization or revascularization.

angiogenesis

(ăn′jē-ō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. angiogene·ses (-sēz′)
The formation of new blood vessels.

an′gi·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

angiogenesis

[an′jē·ōjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, angeion + genesis, origin
the formation of new blood vessels, a process controlled by chemicals produced in the body that stimulate blood vessels or form new ones. Angiogenesis plays an important role in the growth and spread of cancer. Angiogenesis also occurs in the healthy body for healing of wounds and restoring blood flow to tissues after injury.

angiogenesis

The development of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. Angiogenesis plays a fundamental role in embryonic development, tissue and wound repair, resolution of inflammation, and onset of neoplasia. It is linked to an array of pathological conditions (e.g., cancer, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis).

angiogenesis

The sprouting of new blood vessels and capillary beds from existing vessels, which plays a fundamental role in embryonic development, tissue and wound repair, resolution of inflammation, and onset of neoplasia; angiogenesis is linked to certain pathologies–eg, cancer, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis

an·gi·o·gen·e·sis

(an'jē-ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. Development of blood vessels in the embryo. 2. Any formation of new blood vessels.
[angio- + G. genesis, production]

angiogenesis

The origination and development of new capillary blood vessels in normal or malignant tissue. Angiogenesis is necessary so that a growing or enlarging tissue, with its increasing metabolic needs, obtains an adequate blood supply providing oxygen, nutrients and waste drainage. Various angiogenetic factors are secreted by blood-deprived (ischaemic) cells and these operate on the inner lining (endothelium) of existing blood vessels to cause the budding out of new capillaries. Angiogenesis can be exploited in two ways in medicine-it can, in theory be inhibited in the treatment of CANCER, DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, obesity, ENDOMETRIOSIS and ATHEROSCLEROSIS; or it can be encouraged to treat heart attacks, ununited fractures, neurodegenerative disease, peripheral blood circulation deficiencies and baldness.

angiogenesis

process of forming new blood vessels, normally accompanies the growth of MALIGNANT tissue. TUMOURS need angiogenesis to provide the nutrients and oxygen for development and METASTATIS.

Angiogenesis

The formation of new blood vessels, for example, as a result of a tumor.

angiogenesis (anˈ·jē·ō·jeˑ·n·sis),

n the formation and growth of new blood vessels.

VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) 

A major protein involved in regulating the differentiation and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells thus promoting the growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). VEGF is essential for normal embryonic development and contributes to the maintenance and repair of tissues. There are several VEGF proteins, depending on the number of amino acids that they contain (e.g. VEGF 121, VEGF 165, VEGF 189 and VEGF 206). However, under certain circumstances (e.g. higher than normal levels of VEGF as happens in hypoxia) it may participate in cancerous processes, inflammatory processes (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis) and ocular neovascularization as in exudative (wet) age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Anti-VEGF drugs are used to inhibit the action of VEGF. See anti-VEGF drugs.

angiogenesis

the development of blood vessels.

tumor angiogenesis
the induction of the growth of blood vessels from surrounding tissue into a solid tumor by a diffusible chemical factor released by the tumor cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
company a new method and device patent, United States Patent 6,546,932, providing broad coverage for CryoCath's arteriogenesis program, a novel therapy for the more than 500,000 patients worldwide suffering from chronic cardiac ischemia.
The collateral vessels are induced by sheer stress on the endothelium by the process of arteriogenesis (note the distinction with angiogenesis which occurs in response to hypoxia).
AX200 stops neuronal cell death in the acute phase of Stroke, and in addition, it stimulates the regeneration of the already damaged nervous tissue through the stimulation of neurogenesis as well as arteriogenesis and the reorganisation of neuronal networks.
The growth factors and cytokines such as VEGF and EPO (4), which are secreted in response to hypoxia, may stimulate the resident and remote cells to induce angio- and arteriogenesis with paracrine end endocrine mechanisms.
More recently, in functional studies, which were done in animals, arteriogenesis has been shown to correlate directly with the concentration of circulating monocytes and the amount of accumulating monocytes/macrophages in the perivascular tissue (26).
By increasing cell transfection efficiency and reaching both the peri-ischemic regions and pre-existing collaterals in the heart, this modified approach offers the potential to effectively simulate both angiogenesis and arteriogenesis to bring about improved blood flow.