arterial blood gas

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Related to Arterial blood gas test: ABG, Arterial blood gas analysis

arterial blood gas

n.
The concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, whose partial pressures are measured along with other factors such as blood pH in order to assess oxygen saturation and other metabolic indicators in patients, especially those with respiratory disorders.

arterial blood gas (ABG)

the oxygen and carbon dioxide content of arterial blood, measured by various methods to assess the adequacy of ventilation and oxygenation and the acid-base status of the body. Oxygen saturation of hemoglobin is normally 95% or higher. The partial pressure of arterial oxygen, normally 80 to 100 mm Hg, is increased in hyperventilation and decreased in cardiac decompensation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and certain neuromuscular disorders. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide, normally 35 to 45 mm Hg, may be higher in emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and reduced respiratory center function; it may be lower in pregnancy and in the presence of pulmonary emboli and anxiety.

arterial blood gas

Critical care Analysis of arterial blood for O2, CO2, bicarbonate content, and pH, which reflects the functional effectiveness of lung function and to monitor respiratory therapy Ref range pO2, 75-100 mm Hg; pCO2, 35-45 mm Hg; pH: 7.35-7.42, O2 content: 15-23%; O2 saturation, 94-100%; HCO3, 22-26 mEq/L. See Metabolic acidosis, Metabolic alkalosis, Respiratory acidosis, Respiratory alkalosis.

arterial blood gas

Abbreviation: ABG
Any of the gases present in blood. Operationally and clinically, ABGs include the determination of levels of pH, oxygen (O2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood. ABGs are important in the diagnosis and treatment of disturbances of acid-base balance, pulmonary disease, electrolyte balance, and oxygen delivery. Values of the gases themselves are usually expressed as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide or oxygen although derived values are reported in other units. Several other blood chemistry values are important in managing acid-base disturbances, including the levels of the bicarbonate ion (HCO3), blood pH, sodium, potassium, and chloride.
See also: gas