arterial blood gas

(redirected from Arterial blood gas analysis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

arterial blood gas

n.
The concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, whose partial pressures are measured along with other factors such as blood pH in order to assess oxygen saturation and other metabolic indicators in patients, especially those with respiratory disorders.

arterial blood gas (ABG)

the oxygen and carbon dioxide content of arterial blood, measured by various methods to assess the adequacy of ventilation and oxygenation and the acid-base status of the body. Oxygen saturation of hemoglobin is normally 95% or higher. The partial pressure of arterial oxygen, normally 80 to 100 mm Hg, is increased in hyperventilation and decreased in cardiac decompensation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and certain neuromuscular disorders. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide, normally 35 to 45 mm Hg, may be higher in emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and reduced respiratory center function; it may be lower in pregnancy and in the presence of pulmonary emboli and anxiety.

arterial blood gas

Critical care Analysis of arterial blood for O2, CO2, bicarbonate content, and pH, which reflects the functional effectiveness of lung function and to monitor respiratory therapy Ref range pO2, 75-100 mm Hg; pCO2, 35-45 mm Hg; pH: 7.35-7.42, O2 content: 15-23%; O2 saturation, 94-100%; HCO3, 22-26 mEq/L. See Metabolic acidosis, Metabolic alkalosis, Respiratory acidosis, Respiratory alkalosis.

arterial blood gas

Abbreviation: ABG
Any of the gases present in blood. Operationally and clinically, ABGs include the determination of levels of pH, oxygen (O2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood. ABGs are important in the diagnosis and treatment of disturbances of acid-base balance, pulmonary disease, electrolyte balance, and oxygen delivery. Values of the gases themselves are usually expressed as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide or oxygen although derived values are reported in other units. Several other blood chemistry values are important in managing acid-base disturbances, including the levels of the bicarbonate ion (HCO3), blood pH, sodium, potassium, and chloride.
See also: gas
References in periodicals archive ?
Our data demonstrate that the pH level determined by arterial blood gas analysis at hospital admission is more accurate than the APACHE II score as a marker for predicting death in V.
TABLE 4 Transfusion preferences by number of participants Hb <70 g/l Hb <80 g/l Hb <90 g/l Patient >60 y, bleeding 1 15 50 Patient >60 y, 23 37 6 not bleeding Patient <60 y, bleeding 4 28 34 Patient <60 y, 45 17 4 not bleeding TABLE 5 Likelihood of acidosis on first arterial blood gas analysis (%) 10-50% of <10% of patients patients >50% of patients Anaesthesia -- 60 40 Intensive care 5 53 42 Emergency 19 65 16 Total 12 61 27
Finally the arterial blood gas analysis results should be com pared.
Arterial blood gas analysis and haemodynamic measurements were performed at skin incision (T1), five minutes after weaning from CPB (T2), five minutes after chest closure (T3) and four hours after arrival in ICU (T4).
Table 2 Arterial blood gas analysis and haemodynamic data T1 T2 Fi[O.
Overall, however, the process of care appeared to differ, since pulse oximetry, arterial blood gas analysis, pulmonary function tests, and electrocardiograms were more likely to be ordered for patients who had any sleep history recorded (by medical students and house officers).
Overall With Sleep History Test (n = 208) (n = 18) Pulse oximetry 85 (41) 14 (78) Arterial blood gas analysis 68 (33) 12 (67) Chest radiograph 137 (66) 12 (67) Pulmonary function test 4 (2) 2 (11) Thyroid function test 18 (9) 2 (11) Electrocardiogram 107 (51) 14 (78) Holter monitor 20 (10) 2 (11) Echocardiogram 42 (20) 3 (17) No.
The epidural provided satisfactory analgesia and the patient was able to breathe adequately with normal gas exchange, confirmed by arterial blood gas analysis.
However, I wish to bring to notice the possibility of misinterpretation of oxygenation status in such patients, when using pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis as measures of tissue oxygenation.
Repositioning the probe onto the foot provided a normal trace and oximetry readings, which were confirmed by arterial blood gas analysis.
Dependent areas should be avoided as sites for pulse oximetry recording and there should be a low threshold for confirmation of low pulse oximetry readings with arterial blood gas analysis.
The arterial blood gas analysis was essentially normal except for a mild metabolic acidosis, which was not corrected.