Artemisia

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Related to Artemisias: Artemisia vulgaris, Roman wormwood

Artemisia

/Ar·te·mi·sia/ (ahr″tĕ-mis´e-ah) [L.] a genus of composite-flowered plants. A. absin´thium is common wormwood and A. vulga´ris (mugwort) is the source of moxa and is also used orally.

Artemisia

(art?e-mezh'(e-)a) [L. artemisia fr. Gr Artemis, Artemis (the goddess) + -ia]
A large genus of plants belonging to the daisy family.

Artemisia annua

A Chinese herb used as a source of artesunate (an antimalarial drug).

Artemisia vulgaris

See: mugwort

Artemisia

a genus of the plant family Asteraceae. Includes A. filifolia, A. canescens, A. spinescens, A. vulgaris (mugwort) and more than 200 other plants comprising a large part of the sagebrush of the western range of the USA. Under exceptional circumstances and with very heavy grazing they may cause unspecified poisonings. A. canescens causes selenium poisoning of sheep.

Artemisia absinthium
contains oil of absinthe and may be irritant. Called also wormwood.
References in periodicals archive ?
HOSTAS ARTEMISIA 'POWYS CASTLE' STUDDED WITH SILVER COTTON LAVENDER PULSATILLA
In the image of the narrator inhaling--that is, incorporating into her twentieth-century body--the "dust" of both the "real" and "fictive" Artemisias, the abandonment of all the "natural" iconic structures, the overthrowing of all boundaries and demarcations is complete.
Susan Sontag begins her introduction to a new English edition of the Italian novel, Artemisia, a piece of historical fiction about the Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi published in 1947 by Anna Banti, by citing its famous opening words "non piangere" ("don't cry"), returning repeatedly to the phrase (Sontag 1).
Through the dialogic interaction between the character of Artemisia and the author figure within the novel, a new "history" is envisioned, in which the oppositions between fact and fiction and past and present are deconstructed, the boundaries between them rendered fluid, shifting, open.
excluded from the social order as defined by patriarchy Artemisia enters--temporarily--a wild zone reminiscent of the island in William Golding's Lord of the Flies in its violence, its inversion of habitual social rules .
9) The process of painting "Oloferne," as well as denaturalizing and forcing the reader to "see" the assymetrical gaze, opens the possibility for Artemisia to escape from the hierarchies of subject/object and the limiting duality of the surveyor/surveyed options in her own constitution of identity, offering a third option.
7) Deborah Heller, in her article "Remembering Artemisia: Anna Banti and Artemisia Gentileschi," makes some interesting comments on this: "Any account of the narrative's ideosyncratic status must also consider the crucial interaction between author-narrator and protagonist, through which the narative self-consciously violates a more 'traditonal' narrative convention of self-sustaining illusion.
In an effort to evaluate, whether other constituents than artemisinin in Artemisia annua may also reveal cytotoxicity towards cancer cells we focused on two artemisinin-related compounds, arteanuine B and artemisitene, and two other compounds without structural similarity to artemisinin, scopoletin and 1,8-cineole, which are also present in this plant.
Artemisia annua was obtained from different sources to test the variability of different specimens.
They were treated with 0-5 mg/ml of Artemisia annua extract 0-5 mg/ml pure compound for 24 h.
Cytotoxicity of extracts and single constituents of Artemisia annua towards trypanosomes
Dichloromethane or methanol extracts of six different Artemisia annua samples of different origin have been tested for their activity to inhibit the growth of trypanosomes.