artefact

(redirected from Artefacts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Artefacts: Artifacts

artifact

 [ahr´tĭ-fakt]
1. any artificial product; a structure or appearance that is not natural, but is due to manipulation.
2. distortion or fuzziness of an image caused by manipulation, such as during compression of a digital file.
film artifact artificial images on x-ray films due to storage, handling, or processing.
phantom artifact artificial images seen with conventional tomography.
standardization artifact an electrical stimulus of 1 mV deliberately introduced into the electrocardiogram so that pulse amplitudes on the tracing can be adjusted to 10 mm. The amplitudes of the P, QRS, and T intervals can be accurately evaluated only on an electrocardiogram thus standardized.

ar·ti·fact

(ar'ti-fakt),
1. Anything, especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record, which is caused by the technique used and does not reflect the original specimen or experiment.
2. A skin lesion produced or perpetuated by self-inflicted action, as in dermatitis artefacta.
Synonym(s): artefact
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

/ar·te·fact/ (ahr´tĕ-fakt″) artifact.

artefact

(är′tə-făkt′)
n.
Variant of artifact.

artefact

See artifact.

artefact

(1) A structure not normally present, but produced by some external action; something artificial.
(2) The distortion of a substance or signal which interferes with or obscures the interpretation of a study, or a structure that is not representative of a specimen’s in vivo state, or which does not reflect the original sample, but rather is the result of an isolation procedure, its handling or other factors. Artefacts in electronic readout devices (e.g., EEG, EKG, and EMG) may be due to loose leads or electrical contacts.
 
Cardiology
An electrical impulse of noncardiac origin which is recorded as a vertical spike on an EKG or other ECG monitor (e.g., a pacemaker pulse); electrical signals from muscle contractions, or myopotentials, are called muscle artefacts.
 
Histology
Any change in tissue that occurs during tissue processing which may alter a tissue’s appearance and possibly the diagnosis.

Imaging
The artefact seen depends on the procedure. For example, in a barium enema, where zones of inconstant segmental contractions of the colon may be confused with organic constrictions or anatomic variations due to mucosal or intramural tumours, or a metal surgical clip that obscures an anatomical structure.

ar·ti·fact

(ahr'ti-fakt)
1. Anything (especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record) that is caused by the technique used or is not a natural occurrence but is merely incidental.
2. A skin lesion produced or perpetuated by self-inflicted action, such as scratching in dermatitis artefacta.
Synonym(s): artefact.
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

something that appears during preparation or examination of material which is not present in the natural state. Two scientists from the University of Surrey, Harold Hillman and Peter Sartory, have suggested on the evidence provided by solid geometry, that some structures described by electron microscopy, e.g. Golgi apparatus, nuclear pores, endoplasmic reticulum, are artefacts of the preparation of material.

artefact

self-inflicted skin trauma

artefact 

Anything made or introduced artificially which misleads the results of an investigation, image or test. Example: in visual evoked cortical potentials, any wave that has its origin elsewhere than in the visual area.

ar·ti·fact

, artefact (ahr'ti-fakt)
Anything, especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record or x-ray, caused by the technique used that does not reflect the original specimen or experiment.
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

artifact
References in periodicals archive ?
Authorities have recovered a further 130,000 artefacts stolen from elsewhere in the country, but there are still tens of thousands of pieces missing.
On ridgesides adjacent to a riparian zone, artefacts and sites fade rapidly from a high density to a low density with increasing distance from the stream.
Away from major streams, artefacts on ridgesides are negligible except where they are only gently sloping, where they occur at very low density.
They concluded that a lot of Palestinian heritage would have been lost in the event the smuggler had been successful in getting out of the Palestinian territories with those artefacts.
The functioning of this transport system is not only highly dependent on the functioning of technical artefacts, but also on the functioning of social (legal, institutional, economic) elements and on the behaviour of various actors.
So if we enlarge the boundaries of engineering systems, the heterogeneity of the system increases in a double sense: the system tends to contain technical artefacts from different engineering disciplines and additionally non-technical elements beside technical artefacts.
In more recent years these issues have been investigated for assemblages of material culture, including pottery, mobile art, and stone artefacts (e.
Sample', in this context, is used specifically to refer to the assemblage of artefacts recovered from a particular level in a stratified site, or from the site as a whole.
George Dickie, for whom the notion of artefact is central, was content to accept what he called its ordinary dictionary definition: an object made by man, especially with a view to subsequent use.
At a certain stage this allows him to define an artefact as 'an intentionally modified tool whose modified properties were intended by the agent to be recognized by an agent at a later time as having been intentionally altered for that, or some other, use' (29-30).
Walker (1964) recognised human and non-human disturbance processes in the site that had the capacity to mix sediments and stone artefacts they contained.
As we argued elsewhere (Hiscock and Attenbrow 1998), assertions that vertical movement of artefacts may have occurred are not evidence that it did.