artefact

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Related to Artefacts: Artifacts

artifact

 [ahr´tĭ-fakt]
1. any artificial product; a structure or appearance that is not natural, but is due to manipulation.
2. distortion or fuzziness of an image caused by manipulation, such as during compression of a digital file.
film artifact artificial images on x-ray films due to storage, handling, or processing.
phantom artifact artificial images seen with conventional tomography.
standardization artifact an electrical stimulus of 1 mV deliberately introduced into the electrocardiogram so that pulse amplitudes on the tracing can be adjusted to 10 mm. The amplitudes of the P, QRS, and T intervals can be accurately evaluated only on an electrocardiogram thus standardized.

ar·ti·fact

(ar'ti-fakt),
1. Anything, especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record, which is caused by the technique used and does not reflect the original specimen or experiment.
2. A skin lesion produced or perpetuated by self-inflicted action, as in dermatitis artefacta.
Synonym(s): artefact
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

/ar·te·fact/ (ahr´tĕ-fakt″) artifact.

artefact

(är′tə-făkt′)
n.
Variant of artifact.

artefact

See artifact.

artefact

(1) A structure not normally present, but produced by some external action; something artificial.
(2) The distortion of a substance or signal which interferes with or obscures the interpretation of a study, or a structure that is not representative of a specimen’s in vivo state, or which does not reflect the original sample, but rather is the result of an isolation procedure, its handling or other factors. Artefacts in electronic readout devices (e.g., EEG, EKG, and EMG) may be due to loose leads or electrical contacts.
 
Cardiology
An electrical impulse of noncardiac origin which is recorded as a vertical spike on an EKG or other ECG monitor (e.g., a pacemaker pulse); electrical signals from muscle contractions, or myopotentials, are called muscle artefacts.
 
Histology
Any change in tissue that occurs during tissue processing which may alter a tissue’s appearance and possibly the diagnosis.

Imaging
The artefact seen depends on the procedure. For example, in a barium enema, where zones of inconstant segmental contractions of the colon may be confused with organic constrictions or anatomic variations due to mucosal or intramural tumours, or a metal surgical clip that obscures an anatomical structure.

ar·ti·fact

(ahr'ti-fakt)
1. Anything (especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record) that is caused by the technique used or is not a natural occurrence but is merely incidental.
2. A skin lesion produced or perpetuated by self-inflicted action, such as scratching in dermatitis artefacta.
Synonym(s): artefact.
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

something that appears during preparation or examination of material which is not present in the natural state. Two scientists from the University of Surrey, Harold Hillman and Peter Sartory, have suggested on the evidence provided by solid geometry, that some structures described by electron microscopy, e.g. Golgi apparatus, nuclear pores, endoplasmic reticulum, are artefacts of the preparation of material.

artefact

self-inflicted skin trauma

artefact 

Anything made or introduced artificially which misleads the results of an investigation, image or test. Example: in visual evoked cortical potentials, any wave that has its origin elsewhere than in the visual area.

ar·ti·fact

, artefact (ahr'ti-fakt)
Anything, especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record or x-ray, caused by the technique used that does not reflect the original specimen or experiment.
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

artifact
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the major questions in Australian archaeology has been the antiquity of the distinctive backed artefacts and points that are generally thought to appear in the Holocene.
It is my intention to now explore similar arguments for the vertical distribution of backed artefacts, and other implement types, in sites in eastern Australia, thereby revealing the general occurrence of the sample-size effect.
Since charcoal near the base of the sequence gave a radiocarbon date of 3560 [+ or -] 80 (ANU 1762), the entire artefact assemblage has formed during the period when all commentators agree that backed artefacts were being manufactured in the region (Johnson 1979; Morwood 1981).
Much of his discussion focused on the timing of the apparent introduction and eventual disappearance of implement types, particularly backed artefacts.
Nielson hypothesizes that the larger and medium-sized artefacts displaced by trampling in the traffic zones will eventually collect in the marginal zones where they are protected (in some cases by physical barriers) from further trampling.
High ceiling areas might be the place where people undertook most activities; perhaps tossing and caching artefacts into the low ceiling zones (e.
When studies in post-depositional movement of artefacts have gone straight from a generalized model to testing in the archaeological data, the temptation is to keep varying the model's parameters until a fit with the archaeology is found.
For this experiment a 3-m wide section of the cave was selected [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED]) with the greatest variety of ceiling-heights; 147 flakes, flaked pieces and cores made on basalt were selected for the experiment, divided into size classes by weight - when all artefacts are of the same material their weights are directly proportional to their size.
The original system was to have allowed for the capture of images that could be retrieved for further studies, with the ability to rotate images, zoom portions of artefacts for closer inspection and collect measurements about individual artefacts or portions of artefacts.
Rather, there were variably severe intrinsic errors in the measurements due not to any deficiencies in the Fourier algorithm itself, but to the character of artefacts being analysed.
presence of translucent artefacts among the assemblages, and
First, when artefacts were so thick as to cast a small shadow on the tray beneath the camera, the quasi-perimeter of the image captured by the camera might include the shadow of the artefact, rather than the actual edge of the artefact.