hay

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hay

dried green grass (meadow hay) or cereal crop (wheat, oats or barley hay) or legume crop (lucerne, alfalfa) used as feed for housed animals in the winter time and for supplementary feeding of pastured animals when there is need.

hay itch
see glycyphagusdestructor.
hay net
a wide-mesh string net to be filled, and hung in a loose box, to provide day-long nibbling for a confined horse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lebanon's Armenian parties are split between the March 14 and March 8 alliances, but Pakradounian said they are united in gaining recognition of the genocide.
Later on Thursday, a prayer was held at the Archbishopric of the Dioceses of the Armenian Apostolic Church in Old Damascus city commemorating the anniversary.
Many Armenians were displaced from their motherland to neighbouring countries after the Armenian Genocide of 1915, so many members of our church have dual nationalities," said Father Mesrob.
Papazian headed the Armenian Assembly of America in 1975, when a non-binding resolution recognizing the mass killings as genocide, passed through Congress.
Author Libaridian, who is professor of modern Armenian history at the University of Michigan, has detailed the recent history of the Armenians still living in their ancient homeland and has produced a most competent book that traces the history of the Armenian peoples, at least from the Nineteenth century through to present times.
In ``Screamers,'' the four members of System of a Down, who are Armenian and grew up in Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley, talk about their missing family trees and protest outside the Illinois office of former House Speaker Dennis J.
More than one million Armenians died from 1915 to 1917 in what they term the Armenian genocide, a term disputed by Turkey, which controlled Armenia at the time.
James Russell has also published on problems in Armenian linguistics, though most of his etymological essays greatly involve Iranian data.
Here on the borders of the conflict with Islam is a part of life for the Christian Armenians; it goes all the way back to the days when they stood between pagan Rome and Zoroastrian Persia Though the Armenian nation officially declared itself Christian in 301, 30 years before Constantine did the same, they trace their Christian roots to the Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus who were martyred here and gave the name to the Armenian Apostolic church.
All of these strands, directly and indirectly, anchor themselves in the historical fact of the Armenian genocide at the hands of the Turks in 1915.
Marcom draws from the folk saying: "Three apples fell from heaven, one for the storyteller, one for the listener, and one for the eavesdropper," to tie together the unraveling lives of several Armenians during WW I.
Next year marks 1700 years since the proclamation of Christianity in Armenia and the founding of the Armenian Apostolic church.

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