Aristotle

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A·ris·tot·le

(ar'is-tot-ĕl),
of Stagira, Greek philosopher and scientist, 384-322 bce. See: Aristotle anomaly, aristotelian method.

Aristotle,

Greek philosopher and scientist, 384-322 B.C.
Aristotelian method - a method of study that stresses the relation between a general category and a particular object.
Aristotle anomaly
References in periodicals archive ?
Having thus been emptied of life, or the traditional unity of body and soul that, ever since Aristotle, was thought to sustain life, the "first good" becomes unintelligible or at best a fable much like Descartes's autobiography in the Discourse on Method.
Communal Links Between The Sophos and the Politician in Aristotle
To sum up, Plato would thus appear to be both a greater Aristotelian than Aristotle, and a greater sophist than the Sophists.
Her argument depends largely on a tradition concerning bodily generation that derives from Aristotle, who, along with Dryden, is presumed to operate from a sexist position.
Ryn tries to prove that a temptation toward revolutionary politics, which wise teachers from Aristotle to Burke solemnly disavowed, was inherent in our political culture from the beginning.
Jullien's quest is an attempt to escape from a 'mental cage', to try to push to the limit the experience of thinking in a foreign setting; which in particular means trying to think beyond the categories of thought (substance, quantity, quality) that Aristotle believed he had isolated in the absolute, whereas they were in fact peculiar to his language, Greek.
But in natural sciences whose conclusions are true and necessary and have nothing to do with human will, one must take care not to place oneself in the defense of error; for here a thousand Demostheneses and a thousand Aristotles would be left in the lurch by every mediocre wit who happened to hit upon the truth for himself.
And here, therefore, it would [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] Leonardo's counterpart in the 20th century is undoubtedly Albert Schweitzer (18 is summed up in the term Reverence for Life, a universal code of ethics that [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] Norman Cousins, the late editor of the now sadly defunct Saturday Review, visit [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] The Aristotles, the da Vincis, the Goethes, the Jeffersons, the Schweitzers are, in [Alpha][Epsilon]i, possessions forever.
But in the natural sciences, whose conclusions are true and necessary and have nothing to do with human will, one must take care not to place oneself in the defense o f error; for here a thousand Demostheneses and a thousand Aristotles would be left in the lurch by every mediocre wit who happened to hit upon the truth for himself.
Alker then proceeds to identify three Aristotles - the ethical, the systematic, and the cosmological - and establish the significance of each for contemporary scholarship, including his own.
To Aristotles heroic virtues were added three more: faith, hope, and love.