arginase

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arginase

 [ahr´jĭ-nās]
an enzyme of the liver that splits arginine into urea and ornithine.

ar·gi·nase

(ar'ji-nās),
An enzyme of the liver that catalyzes the hydrolysis of l-arginine to l-ornithine and urea; a key enzyme of the urea cycle. A deficiency of arginase leads to arginemia.
Synonym(s): canavanase

arginase

/ar·gi·nase/ (ahr´jĭ-nās) an enzyme existing primarily in the liver, which hydrolyzes arginine to form urea and ornithine in the urea cycle.

arginase

(är′jə-nās′, -nāz)
n.
An enzyme found primarily in the liver that catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to form urea and ornithine.

arginase

[är′jinās]
an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine during the urea cycle, producing urea and ornithine. The enzyme is found primarily in the liver but also occurs in the mammary gland, testes, and kidney.

ar·gi·nase

(ahr'ji-nās)
An enzyme of the liver that catalyzes the hydrolysis of l-arginine to l-ornithine and urea; a key enzyme of the urea cycle.

arginase

an enzyme of the urea cycle in the liver that splits arginine into urea and ornithine; abbreviated ARG. Significant amounts occur only in ureotelic mammals such as dogs, cats, sheep, pigs, rats and humans. Elevated blood levels are associated with acute hepatic necrosis and determination of arginase levels in plasma or serum is a good liver-specific test in these species. Called also arginine amidinase, canavanase.