Ardipithecus ramidus

Ardipithecus ramidus

The earliest known hominid ancestor of Homo sapiens, who predates Australopithecus afarensis (known as Lucy, of the Olduvai Gorge) by 1 million years. Ardipithecus was discovered in 1994 by T White and A Walker in Chad, and believed to have lived 4.4 million years ago in the dense African woodlands. A ramidus represents a paradigm shift in paleoanthropology, in that the newest data suggests that man did not evolve from chimps, but rather that we shared a common ancestor.

Indirect evidence suggests that A ramidus was bipedal, and that some were 122 cm tall. The teeth are intermediate between those of earlier apes and A afarensis. Other fossils found with A ramidus indicate that it may have been a forest dweller; this may force modification of current theories about why hominids became bipedal, which previously linked bipedalism to a move to savannahs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Remains of more than 100 individuals from Ardi's species, Ardipithecus ramidus, confirm that these early hominids were not built like modern chimps or humans, Tim White of the University of California, Berkeley, and his colleagues concluded in the April 21 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Hasta la fecha, el primer hominido conocido es el Ardipithecus ramidus, que vivio hace 4.
4 million-year-old African species Ardipithecus ramidus is related to the human lineage.
This fossil horse was among the diverse array of animals that lived in the same areas as the ancient human ancestor Ardipithecus ramidus, commonly called Ardi.
The fossil remains do, however, closely resemble those of an earlier human ancestral species, Ardipithecus ramidus, which lived about a million years earlier.
Entre 1992 y 1994 se encontraron restos fosiles de una especie hasta ese momento desconocida, a la que se le llamo Ardipithecus ramidus (nombre tomado del lenguaje de Afar, que significa, en traduccion libre, "echar raices en tierra") cuando se pudo reconstruir un esqueleto con el craneo con dientes, brazos, manos, pelvis, piernas y pies.
Her scientific name is Ardipithecus ramidus, and scientists call her Ardi for short.
Ardi - Ardipithecus ramidus - was found in 1994 in the Ethiopia's Afar desert.
Ardipithecus ramidus, nicknamed "Ardi" by scientists, possessed a bizarre amalgam of human and apelike traits.
2 million years ago--nearly a million and a half years earlier than the previous record holder [given the name Lucy (Johanson and Edey, 1981)] and very close to the time when humans and chimps first went their separate evolutionary ways" (Lemonick and Dorfman, 56), Haile-Selassie classified this earliest ancestor as Ardipithecus ramidus kadabba.
Los fosiles de esta epoca se han adscrito a las especies Ardipithecus ramidus, Australopithecus anamensis, A.
A Los Alamos National Laboratory geologist is part of an international research team responsible for discovering the oldest nearly intact skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus, who lived 4.