Apt test


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Apt test

(apt),
a test for identifying fetal blood by the addition of sodium hydroxide and water to a specimen.

Apt test

a test for blood in the stool of a newborn. The test differentiates between maternal and newborn blood. The presence of newborn blood indicates active GI bleeding or necrotizing enterocolits.

Apt test

[Leonard Apt, U.S. pediatric ophthalmologist]
A test used originally to identify the source of black (bloody) stools in newborn infants; it is now used in modified form to distinguish fetal from maternal hemoglobin in blood samples from any source, e.g., the umbilical cord or the gastrointestinal tract.
See: swallowed blood syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Fabrian and Herwany (2010) investigate the ability of both CAPM and APT to explain excess portfolio returns in the Jakarta stock exchange and find that while beta does not on its own explain excess returns, two macroeconomic variables namely exchange rate and interest rate spread appear to be significant in APT test.
The Apt test is a qualitative test to identify the source of blood present in stool of newborns for differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding (1).
Our results indicate that the HPLC method has much higher sensitivity and specificity than the Apt test.
The Apt test required a minimum of 40 mL/100 g cord blood (with HbF 80% of the total hemoglobin) for detection of fetal hemoglobin (Table 1).
Traditionally, the Apt test (1) has been used to distinguish the source of blood in such specimens for differential diagnosis of newborn gastrointestinal bleeding.
The HPLC method we describe here has advantages over both the original Apt test and the modified procedures based on alkaline denaturation (1, 4, 5).
Improved quantitative Apt test for detecting fetal hemoglobin in bloody stools of newborns.
Q We occasionally get an order for an Apt test to determine if the blood in a neonate's emesis or stool is maternal or fetal in origin.
Incidentally, the Apt test is not included in the CPT code listing of reimbursable laboratory tests.
1] So perhaps point-of-care monitoring of hemoglobin levels might be a reasonable substitute for the Apt test.
We assume that to take the decision of an elimination dietary program according to the results of food APT tests would be an inconvenient approach.
APT tests are considered less complex than many of those currently listed as being of moderate complexity but are not appropriate for waiver.