case

(redirected from Application generator)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

case

 [kās]
a particular instance of a disease or other problem; sometimes used incorrectly to designate the patient with the disease.
case history the collected data concerning an individual, the family, and environment; it includes the medical history and any other information that may be useful in analyzing and diagnosing the case or for instructional or research purposes.
case method a type of nursing care delivery system; see nursing practice.
case mix the groups of patients requiring similar tests, procedures, and resources that are treated at a particular hospital. Case mix is a way to define a hospital's production and has been identified as a major factor in differing costs among hospitals and among individual patients.

case

(kās),
An instance of disease with its attendant circumstances. Compare: patient.
[L. casus, an occurrence]

case

(kās) an instance of a disease.
index case  the case of the original patient (propositus or proband) that stimulates investigation of other members of the family to discover a possible genetic factor. In epidemiology, the first case of a contagious disease.
trial case  a box containing lenses, arranged in pairs, a trial spectacle frame, and other devices used in testing vision.

case

Etymology: L, causus, a happening
1 an episode of illness or injury.
2 a container.

CASE

Abbreviation for:
Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (Medspeak-UK)
Cognitive Assessment Scale for the Elderly
co-ordinated activities, services and encounters

CASE

Neurology A clinical trial–Canadian Activase for Stroke Effectiveness. See Thrombolytic therapy.

case

Epidemiology A countable instance in the population or study group of a particular disease, health disorder, or condition under investigation; sometimes, an individual with the particular disease. See Reportable case Forensic medicine A civil or criminal action or event. See Ayala case, Detroit case, Helga Wanglie case, Index case, LifeNet case, Newport Hospital case, Pappas case Medtalk A popular term for a person who presents with a particular set of findings. See Good intern case, Great case Vox populi A person who is unique or special, as in “he's a case&rdquo. ;. See Basket case.

case

(kās)
1. An instance of disease.
2. A box or container.
Compare: patient
[Fr. casse, fr. L. capsa, container]

case,

n 1. illness episode.
2. entire account of the historical perspective of the course of a patient's disease and its management. See also anamnesis, biopathography, and case analysis.
case report,
n a record of a patient's illness, treatment, and recovery.
case taking,
n the procedure of obtaining and documenting a patient's disease development. See also anamnesis, case analysis, and patient history.

case

(kās)
An instance of disease with its attendant circumstances.
[L. casus, occurrence]

case,

n the term often incorrectly used instead of the appropriate noun (e.g.,
patient, flask, denture, casting). Case is not synonymous with patient because the latter is more than just the case of situations they present.
case charting,
n the recording of a patient's status of health or disease.
case dismissal,
n the technique of illustrating to the patient the results of treatment, usually done during the last appointment of a series.
case history,
case management,
n the monitoring and coordination of treatment rendered to patients with specific diagnoses or requiring high cost or extensive services.
case presentation,
n an explanation of dental needs to the patient.
case summary,
n enumeration of all the services to be performed for an estimated amount of money.

case

in epidemiology, an animal which has the specified disease or condition which is under investigation.

case abstract
a structured summary of a case report suitable for computer entry; permits machine sorting and retrieval and leads an investigator to the original paper records on which detailed descriptions must be based.
case-control sampling
selection of cases as a sample to use in a case-control study (below).
case-control study
a retrospective, analytical, epidemiological study. A group of pre-existing cases of the disease are matched with a selected group of control animals that do not have the disease so that the presence or otherwise of an hypothesized disease determinant can be ascertained in both groups.
case fatality rate
the proportion of cases with a specified condition which die within a specified time.
case finding
the strategy of surveying a population to find the sick animals that are the foci of infection; an essential early step in the eradication of any disease.
case history
the collected data concerning an individual, contact and related animals, environment and management procedures, including any past medical history and any other information that may be useful in analyzing and diagnosing the case or for instructional or research purposes.
index case
the first case recorded in an outbreak.
case management
care of a sick animal including specific and supportive medication, surgical intervention, housing, bedding, nutrition, restraint, collection of specimens for submission to laboratory or stall-side tests.
case population
the group of animals in the total population which are sick or infected, as distinct from the control population, which are not sick or infected.
case recording
entry in records of the clinical findings of individual sick animals. May be structured or unstructured, paper or machine, with or without the accounting record for the case.

Patient discussion about case

Q. how do you deal with a mild case of acid reflux

A. You can start with life style changes: if you have symptoms during the night, you can try to elevate the head of your bed. You can try to avoid foods that induce reflux: fatty foods, chocolate, peppermint, and excessive alcohol. Cola, red wine, and orange juice are very acidic, so it would be wise to avoid them too, In addition to these, you can try to use a diary to reveal which kind of food causes symptoms and avoid it.

Try to refrain from lying down immediately after a meal, or eating just before bedtime. Overweight is a risk factor for reflux, so if it's relevant weight reduction is also recommended.

If you feel heartburn, you may chew in order to increase salivation and thus alleviate the symptoms. Smoking has a negative effect on salivation, so smoking cessation is also recommended.

And that's before we even mentioned OTC drugs...

Q. Are medications always needed in a case of insomnia? I've been suffering from insomnia for about a month now- for the first time in my life though. It did start in a few hard days in which I had a lot on my mind. Back then I thought I just have to wait for those issues to be solved and over and I'd be sleeping like a beauty. Guess what- I still find myself lying in bed for hours every night and waking up in the middle of the night after I finally fall asleep. Is there a way to help me sleep without starting to take all kinds of chemicals??

A. I know how frustrating this is! I got this from a Biopsych text:

"Many cases of insomnia are...physician created--in large part because sleeping pills, which are usually prescribed by physicians, are a major cause of insomnia. At first...drugs are effective in increasing sleep, but soon the patient is trapped in a rising spiral as tolerance to the drug develops.
"In one study insomniacs claimed to take an average of 1 hour to fall asleep and to sleep an average of only 4.5 hours per night; but when they were tested in a sleep lab they were found to have an average sleep latency of only 15 minutes and an average nightly sleep duration of 6.5 hours.
"One of the most effective treatments..is sleep restriction therapy. First, the amount of time spent in bed is substantially reduced. Then after a period of sleep restriction, time is gradually increased as long as sleep latency remains in a normal range. Even sever insomnia often benefit from this treatment"(Pinel,

Q. is it true that nowadays there are many more cases of autism than there were 50 years ago?

A. I'm not sure that autism is more common today but rather it's diagnosed better - the diagnosis isn't trivial, and in the past many times autistic children were diagnosed as suffering from childhood schizophrenia or other diseases.

More discussions about case
References in periodicals archive ?
Scripting model of application generators is used within the generative application development, which is the process of parallel development of generators, together with target applications, as shown on Fig.
A current line indicator in the application generator that is an added visual indicator showing current line.
OTC Bulletin Board:IVOC), a leader in speech recognition technology, today announced the release of it's IVR Application Generator 2.
Based on a distributed Windows NT(R) environment with Dialogic telephony boards, users can create applications by dragging and dropping ActiveX controls into the OPUS Composer(TM) application generator.
The latest version of this easy-to-use application generator provides the ability to seamlessly and effortlessly add IP Telephony to CTI applications.
The company's newest product, Forte WebEnterprise Professional Edition(TM), is an application server for rapid creation of Web applications using a graphical wizard-based application generator.
iVoice is offering a solution that incorporates its IVR Application Generator with Intel's Dialogic D/82JCT-U and D/42JCT-U voice boards.
Drag and Drop Application Generator Reduces CTI Development Time and Cost
OTC Bulletin Board: IVOC), a leader in speech recognition technology, today announced The Housing Authority of the City of Decatur Georgia has installed and developed an IVR application with iVoice's IVR Application Generator Tool.

Full browser ?