appetite

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appetite

 [ap´ĕ-tīt]
the desire for food, stimulated by the sight, smell, or thought of food and accompanied by the flow of saliva in the mouth and gastric juice in the stomach. The stomach wall also receives an extra blood supply in preparation for its digestive activity. Appetite is psychological, dependent on memory and associations, as compared with hunger, which is physiologically aroused by the body's need for food. Lack or loss of appetite, known as anorexia, may be due to subjectively unpleasant food, surroundings, or company, or a symptom of either a physical disorder or an emotional disturbance. Excessive appetite may be an indication of either a metabolic disorder or an emotional disturbance.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt),
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
Synonym(s): orexia (2)
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

appetite1

[ap′ətīt]
Etymology: L, appetere, to long for
a natural or instinctive desire, such as for food.

appetite2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as desire to eat when ill or receiving treatment. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

major depressive disorder

Psychiatry A chronic, relapsing illness affecting 3–6% of the population at a given time Lifetime risk 10–15%; it is linked to a high–10% to 20% rate of suicide, and high morbidity when compared with other medical illness Statistics, Intl, low Taiwan 1.5%, Korea 3%, Puerto Rico 4.3%, US 5% High Lebanon 19%, France 16.4%, New Zealand 12% Other findings Positive dexamethasone test, sleep changes–eg, ↓ REM latency DiffDx AIDS, acute intermittent porphyria, amphetamine withdrawal, CA, endocrine disease–eg, Addision's disease, Cushing's disease, hypothyroidism, infectious mononucleosis, influenza, malnutrition, multiple sclerosis, drugs–eg, alpha-methyldopa, benzodiazepines, cimetidine, clonidine, corticosteroids, INH, OCs, propranolol, reserpine, thiazide diuretics
Major depressive disorder, 5 or more criteria
appetite or loss of weight
concentration
• Dysphoric mood Sad, anxious, irritable
• Fatigue or decreased energy
• Guilt or excessive self blame
interest in pleasurable activities
• Psychomotor retardation or agitation
• Sleep disturbances
• Suicidal ideation or suicidal attempt  AMN  16/9/96, p17

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

appetite

Desire, whether for food, drink, sex, work or anything else that humans can enjoy. Lack of appetite for food is called anorexia, of which a particularly dangerous kind is ANOREXIA NERVOSA.

Appetite

The natural instinctive desire for food. It should be distinguished from hunger, which is the body's craving or need for food (either calories or specific nutrients).

appetite

the drive to eat. Influenced by the status of energy balance, psychological and behavioural factors and by health status. It may be increased or decreased pharmacologically. The drive to eat can be evaluated by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for self-report ratings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective food consumption (how much food one could eat), satiety and fullness. See also anorexia, bulimia, hypothalamus.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

appetite

the desire for food. It is stimulated by the sight, smell or thought of food and accompanied by the flow of saliva in the mouth and gastric juice in the stomach. Appetite is psychological, dependent on memory and associations, as compared with hunger, which is physiologically aroused by the body's need for food. Its existence in animals can only be conjectured on the response in the form of food intake. Chronic loss of appetite is known as anorexia.

decreased appetite
depraved appetite
see pica. Called also allotriophagia.
increased appetite
salt appetite
the appetite for salt displayed by animals, especially ruminants, at pasture. Used in the manangement of cattle on extensive range. See also salting.
appetite stimulants
there are several methods available. Bitters such as gentian and pulv. nux. vomica exert some effect in ruminants, probably by stimulating alimentary tract mucosa. Anabolic steroids are sometimes used for this purpose in dogs and cats. A nutritional deficiency of zinc or the B vitamin complex depresses acuity of appetite and dietary supplementation with it can be effective as an appetite stimulant. Suppression of the medullary satiety center by barbiturates and benzodiazepines is also recommended. There are no well-regarded stimulants of the hunger center of the lateral hypothalamus.
References in periodicals archive ?
A concentrated megestrol acetate oral suspension (Megace ES 625 mg/5 mL; Par Pharmaceutical, Spring Valley, NY) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an appetite stimulant in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and is bioequivalent to traditional megestrol acetate (Megace 800 mg/20 mL) (MA-OS; Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ) in fed conditions.
He said: "I cannot think of anything more sick than a company giving appetite stimulants to starving people.
Different types of tonics, appetite stimulants, appetite suppressants, cough syrups, large variety of antidiahorrea, some hormone preparations and lots of other drugs have no indications.
While use of appetite stimulants such as megestrol acetate (Megace(R)) has been associated with improved sense of well being in clinical trials, findings associated with weight gain in clinical studies with oxandrolone (Oxandrin(R)) have included improved scores for global quality of life and performance status or functionality.