appendage

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appendage

 [ah-pen´dij]
a less important portion of an organ, or an outgrowth, such as a tail. Also, a limb or limblike structure.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dij),
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
See also: accessory structures.
[L. appendix]

appendage

/ap·pen·dage/ (ah-pen´dij) a subordinate portion of a structure, or an outgrowth, such as a tail.
epiploic appendages  see under appendix .

appendage

(ə-pĕn′dĭj)
n.
Biology A part or organ, such as an arm, leg, tail, or fin, that is joined to the axis or trunk of a body.

appendage

See appendix.

adnexa

Ancillary structures to main structure. Among health professionals, adnexa usually refers to the fallopian tubes, broad and round uterine ligaments and the ovaries, considered together. Other adnexae in the body include those of the skin (which are more commonly called skin adnexae and include the sweat and apocrine glands, hair and nails) and the eye (which include the eyelids, lacrimal apparatus and orbital tissue), for which the phrase accessory visual structures is more commonly used.

Adnexa

Appendage, ancillary part.
(1) Ovaries, fallopian tubes, associated uterine ligaments—broad, round.
(2) The ancillary glands and structures of the skin—e.g., hair follicles, sebaceous glands.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dăj)
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
See also: adnexa
Synonym(s): appendix (1) .
[L. appendix]

appendage

A part or organ of the body joined to another part. A protruding part of the body.

appendage

any projection from the body of an animal, e.g. legs, mouthparts, antennae.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dăj)
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
[L. appendix]

appendage

1. a protuberant outgrowth, such as a tail, a limb or limblike structure.
2. a thing or part appended.
References in periodicals archive ?
It illustrates that the body was divided into a head, thorax and post-thorax, all of which bore different kinds of appendages, including five pairs of walking legs in the thorax, and rounded appendages likely used to respiration in the post-thorax.
The various types of non-specific appendages observed were sessile nodules (Figure 1b), tags (Figure 1c), and hook-like forms (Figure 1d).
The term Tetrapus refers to Tetrapus Mayr (1885), and Hexapus to a Tetrapus group, who's female have two independent mandibular appendages and hexapodous males, noted as Hexapus subg.
3 mm, margin erose; pilose, except on longitudinal stripes that are white and glabrous, inside glabrescent, glandular in the throat; 4 white external reflexed and geniculate appendages outside the lobes, two of the appendages 7-9 mm long, 1 mm wide, pilose (2-5-celled trichomes), two lateral appendages 4 mm long, 1 mm wide.
The new study, led by the University of Bristol and published today in Nature, describes how the strange species, called Tamisiocaris, used these huge, specialized appendages to filter plankton, similar to the way modern blue whales feed today.
The North Greenland fossil, called Tamisiocaris, was a member of a group of early marine animals which swam using a set of flaps down either side of the body and probably captured large prey with specialised grasping appendages in the front of the mouth.
2007), and culminates in the regression of the ciliated appendages over a period of 4 days (Montgomery and McFall-Ngai, 1994).
INTRODUCTION: The Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) is characteristically small finger like extension from left atrium in human hearts.
Results: Neutrophils bear the same amount of appendages in both genders (p=0.
Skog in having corollas with four appendages external to and between the lobes, and the larger leaf without red spots on its abaxial side.
antennatus) and the valves (supplementary appendages are developed at the very base in the new species, whereas they are situated above the base in M.
19%) had sacral appendages that ranged in size from 2.