Lavoisier

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Lavoisier

 [lah-vwah-zya´]
Antoine Laurent (1743–1794). French chemist, born in Paris and later guillotined by the French Revolutionists. Lavoisier demolished the phlogiston theory (a theory of combustion) and explained the true nature of respiration by his introduction of quantitative relations in chemistry. He was secretary and treasurer of a committee seeking the uniformity of weights and measures in France, which led to the establishment of the metric system.

Lavoisier

(la-vwah'sē-yā),
Antoine Laurent, 1743-1794. French lawyer, chemist, and civil servant; his 1789 Elements of Chemistry offered a new and more systematic understanding of the discipline. Died on the guillotine during the Terror in 1794, a victim of the French Revolution.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his seminal study Lavoisier -- the Crucial Year, published in 1961, the historian of science Henry Guerlac challenged the prevailing opinion that Antoine Lavoisier was the founder of modern chemistry because it simply focused on Lavoisier's creative genius and ignored his intellectual heritage.
The Lavoisier Medal is named in honor of Antoine Lavoisier, the father of modern chemistry, who mentored the founder of the company, E.
In the late 18th century, chemists Robert Boyle and Antoine Lavoisier developed the idea of simple substances.
Dumas was a great admirer of Antoine Lavoisier and wrote the first four volumes of "Oeuvres de Lavoisier" which appeared between 1862 and 1868 [14].
Contractor address : Les Cyclades, 1 rue Antoine Lavoisier
Then, in the 18th century, Antoine Lavoisier defined basal metabolic rate.
Oxygen was discovered by the combined but independent work of two rivals: Joseph Priestley, a self-taught scientist from England, and Antoine Lavoisier, an aristocratic French tax collector and science theorist.
Micrographia" (1665), by Robert Hooke, famed for its illustrations of the discoveries Hooke made using a microscope; - "Traite elementaire de chimie" (1789), by Antoine Lavoisier, which defined the language of chemistry; - "Osnovy khimii" (Principles of Chemistry; 1869-1871), by Dmitri Mendeleev, the discoverer of the periodic table of the elements