antitrust law

(redirected from Antitrust laws)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

antitrust law

Legislation that limits the ability of an enterprise or group of individuals to monopolise a service or product, thereby controlling and restricting free trade.

antitrust law

Government Legislation that limits the ability of organizations or groups of individuals to monopolize a service–or product, thereby controlling and restricting free trade. See Safe harbor rules.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the reasons antitrust law is such a headache to comply with is because what is or is not permissible has changed over time.
But at least the NFLPA now has a bit more leverage in that it can always punt any impasse in negotiations to the courts via decertification and suing under antitrust law.
The Commission is recommended to review the application of the antitrust laws to dynamic markets and determine how to best apply those laws to these new markets (Zywicki, 2004).
The antitrust laws are designed to maintain competitive markets and thereby prevent economic injury to firms and individuals who buy from or sell into those markets.
After a brief introduction to the origins of the antitrust laws and a review of the purposely-vague federal statutes (Sherman, Clayton, and Federal Trade Commission [FTC] Act), the authors explain how the justice department and FTC choose targets and prosecute rogue corporations.
It proves what we have said from the first day in this case -- that Kodak's supposed antitrust case is pure fiction that could not even stand up under any reasoned application of antitrust law principles.
When Lockyer initially announced his investigation, some labor attorneys argued that his suspicions about the legality of the pact were unfounded due to broad exemptions in federal labor law that allow for companies bargaining in a bloc - like Albertson's, Vons and Ralphs - to act in ways that would generally be in violation of antitrust laws.
The antitrust laws stem from our collective fear of monopoly, a bred-in-the-bone knowledge that a supplier of a good or service who lacks competitors will jack up the price, cut the quality, become arrogant and unresponsive, and in general behave obnoxiously.
It is your obligation to know how the antitrust laws apply to associations and to you, personally, as a volunteer leader.
The Judge stated that, although the monetary relief awarded was sufficient to compensate plaintiffs both for the losses they have sustained and for those they will sustain, the fact that the defendants continued to deny any wrongdoing meant that there was a threat that they would continue to violate the antitrust laws and, thus, that injunctive relief was appropriate.
The settlements relate to complaints filed today in which the government alleges violations of the securities and antitrust laws by reason of coordinated action between the Company and Caxton Corporation in connection with transactions in the cash and financing markets for April two-year Treasury notes issued in 1991.