antiretroviral

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antiretroviral

 [an″te-, an″ti-ret´ro-vi″ral]
1. effective against retroviruses.
2. an agent with this quality.

antiretroviral

/an·ti·ret·ro·vi·ral/ (-ret´ro-vi″ral) effective against retroviruses, or an agent with this quality.

antiretroviral

(ăn′tē-rĕt′rō-vī′rəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the replication of retroviruses.
n.
An antiretroviral drug.

antiretroviral

[an′te-, an′ti-ret′ro-vi′ral]
1 effective against retroviruses.
2 a substance or drug that stops or suppresses the activity of retroviruses such as HIV.

antiretroviral

Virology adjective Referring to an agent or effect that counters a retrovirus noun A drug that counters or acts against a retrovirus, usually understood to be HIV; FDA-approved antiretrovirals include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nucleoside analogues and protease inhibitors See Antiretroviral, Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
In three patients who, according to the most sensitive assays, had no HIV in their blood, lymph nodes, or genital tract, the virus roared back soon after the patients stopped taking antiretroviral drugs, researchers at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.
Of the 3,266 women identified, 1,590 had received zidovudine monotherapy, 533 had received a combination of antiretroviral drugs (396 whose treatment included protease inhibitors and 137 whose treatment did not) and 1,143 had not received any antiretroviral drugs.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Greater antiretroviral suppression was maintained after 24 weeks of therapy with MK-0518i, an investigational oral HIV integrase inhibitor in combination with optimized background therapy (OBT) versus placebo plus OBT in HIV-infected patients who failed antiretroviral therapy (ART) and who were resistant to drugs in all three classes of oral antiretroviral drugs.
A5: All of the antiretroviral drugs for HIV have been associated with side effects.
A two-year-old child born with HIV infection and treated with antiretroviral drugs beginning in the first days of life no longer has detectable levels of virus using conventional testing despite not taking HIV medication for 10 months, according to findings presented today at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Atlanta.
6% of HIV-positive pregnant Congolese women were receiving antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV transmission to their babies, despite an official estimate of 36.
7, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As the war on HIV/AIDS begins its fourth decade, medical researchers, pharmaceutical manufacturers, patient advocates and government regulators face a new and unexpected scientific challenge: how to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of promising new antiretroviral drugs when the two traditional study designs - the superiority trial and the non-inferiority trial - are no longer useful in showing improvements in both "treatment experienced" patients and those who have never received drug therapy (treatment-naive patients).
Part of the proceeds will pay for antiretroviral drugs (Round 7).
1) According to an analysis of annual survey data from 16 countries funded by PEPFAR, annual spending on antiretroviral drugs almost doubled between 2005 and 2008, from $117 million to $202 million, with spending on generic medications increasing from 9% ($11 million) to 76% ($155 million) of the total drug expenditure per year.
In the early therapy group, antiretroviral drugs were administered beginning at a median age of 7 weeks.
No association was found between use of antiretroviral therapy and the risk of having a low-birth-weight baby, but nonuse of antiretroviral drugs and use of highly active antiretroviral therapy including a protease inhibitor were associated with increased risks of preterm delivery among women who received prenatal care.
Indeed, we will have failed unless we dramatically and rapidly expand by millions the numbers of people around the world with access to antiretroviral drugs and simultaneously scale up prevention," he said.