antipyretic

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Related to Antipyretics: Paracetamol, aspirin, Antibiotics

antipyretic

 [an″te-, an″ti-pi-ret´ik]
1. effective against fever; called also antifebrile.
2. something having this effect, such as a cold pack, aspirin, or quinine; antipyretic drugs dilate the blood vessels near the surface of the skin, thereby allowing more blood to flow through the skin, where it can be cooled by the air. An antipyretic can also increase perspiration, the evaporation of which cools the body. Called also febricide and febrifuge.

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik),
1. Reducing fever. Synonym(s): antifebrile, febrifugal
2. An agent that reduces fever (for example, acetaminophen, aspirin). Synonym(s): febrifuge
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic

/an·ti·py·ret·ic/ (-pi-ret´ik)
1. relieving or reducing fever.
2. an agent that so acts.

antipyretic

(ăn′tē-pī-rĕt′ĭk, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Reducing or tending to reduce fever.
n.
A medication that reduces fever.

an′ti·py·re′sis (-rē′sĭs) n.

antipyretic

[-pīret′ik]
Etymology: Gk, anti + pyretos, fever
1 pertaining to a substance or procedure that reduces fever. antipyresis, n.
2 an antipyretic agent. Such drugs usually lower the thermodetection set point of the hypothalamic heat regulatory center, with resulting vasodilation and diaphoresis. Widely used antipyretic agents are acetaminophen, aspirin, and NSAIDs. Also called antefebrile, antifebrile, antithermic.

antipyretic

Antifebrile adjective Referring to an antifebrile agent or effect noun An agent that relieves or reduces fever

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik)
1. Reducing fever.
Synonym(s): antifebrile.
2. An agent that reduces fever (e.g., aspirin).
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic

A drug or other measure which lowers a raised body temperature.

Antipyretic

A drug that lowers fever, like aspirin or acetaminophen.
Mentioned in: Fever

antipyretic

an agent that reduces body temperature, e.g. aspirin

antipyretic,

adj/n a drug that reduces fever. Also known as
febrifuge.

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik)
1. Reducing fever.
Synonym(s): antifebrile, febrifugal.
2. An agent that reduces fever (e.g., acetaminophen, aspirin).
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic (an´tīpīret´ik),

n a drug that reduces fever primarily through action on the hypothalamus, thereby resulting in increased heat dissipation through augmented peripheral blood flow and sweating.

antipyretic

1. effective against fever.
2. an agent that relieves fever. Cold packs, aspirin and quinine are all antipyretics. Antipyretic drugs dilate the blood vessels near the surface of the skin, thereby allowing more blood to flow through the skin with increased heat loss by radiation and convection. Also, an antipyretic can increase perspiration, the evaporation of which cools the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fever: beneficial and detrimental effects of antipyretics.
Antipyretics may be considered to make the child more comfortable in the event of complications associated with vaccination, such as cellulitis or systemic complications.
Conclusion: Mothers' definition of fever and antipyretic utilization knowledge are insufficient.
To calculate the dose of the antipyretics accurately the body weights of all patients were measured again in the hospital.
Our findings indicate that hydrocodone, a semisynthetic opioid, was the most problematic agent within the analgesic, antipyretics, and antirheumatics category.
The antipyretic action of paracetamol may be contraindicated in neutropenic patients when it is important to monitor fever.
Antipyretics are drugs which reduce elevated body temperature.
Endogenous antipyretics attenuate fever by influencing the thermoregulatoty neurons in the preoptic region and anterior hypothalamus and in adjacent septal areas.
These categories range from analgesics, antipyretics to aphrodisiacs.
Basic treatment consists of providing supportive therapy, such as hydration and antipyretics, and treating complications, such as pneumonia.
As antipyretics, both paracetamol and ibuprofen are safe and effective for short-term use in children.