antiparticle

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antiparticle

 [an″tĭ-pahr´tĭ-k'l]
either of a pair of elementary particles that have electric charges and magnetic moments of opposite sign and are the same in all other properties, such as mass, lifetime, and spin, e.g., the electron and positron. Every particle has an antiparticle. When antiparticles collide, they are annihilated, and their mass is converted to energy in the form of gamma rays.
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When particles and antiparticles collide, they disappear after emitting light.
The ability to detect these antiparticles in an astrophysical source promises to enhance our understanding of the basic structure of matter and high-energy processes such as solar flares, which regularly have a widespread and disruptive terrestrial impact, but also offer a natural laboratory to address the most fundamental mysteries of the universe we live in.
The concept of antiparticles in nature means that, as a dialectical necessity all particles must have or be their own antiparticles.
The standard theory of particles has electrons, neutrinos, quarks of six flavors each of which has three colors, gluons, plus all of their corresponding antiparticles, plus photons.
The importance of this measurement is that it could eventually provide a "smoking gun" that certain dark matter particles exist and that dark matter particles and antiparticles are annihilating each other in space.
Chen and colleagues reported last year creating and controlling jets of electrons and their antiparticles, positrons, in the lab.
It is sufficient to consider only the electron and its neutrino, the argument being similar for their antiparticles.
Particles called D-mesons seem to decay slightly differently from their antiparticles, according to LHCb physicist Matthew Charles.
As their own antiparticles, photons should pop up in twos at a black hole's edge.
The 'Dirac particles' refer in the present paper to the electron and proton and their respective antiparticles.
The universe seems to have many more particles than antiparticles.
In a smaller Fermilab study, an experiment called MiniBooNE found a different kind of asymmetry between particles and antiparticles.