migraine

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mi·graine

(mī'grān, mi-grān'),
A familial, recurrent syndrome characterized usually by unilateral head pain, accompanied by various focal disturbances of the nervous system, particularly in regard to visual phenomenon, such as scintillating scotomas. Classified as classic migraine, common migraine, cluster headache, hemiplegic migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine, and ophthalmic migraine.
[through O. Fr., fr. G. hēmi- krania, pain on one side of the head, fr. hēmi-, half, + kranion, skull]

migraine

/mi·graine/ (mi´grān) a symptom complex of periodic headaches, usually temporal and unilateral, often with irritability, nausea, vomiting, constipation or diarrhea, and photophobia, preceded by constriction of the cranial arteries, often with resultant prodromal sensory, especially ocular, symptoms (aura), and commencing with the vasodilation that follows.mi´grainous
abdominal migraine  that in which abdominal symptoms are predominant.
basilar migraine , basilar artery migraine a type of ophthalmic migraine whose aura fills both visual fields and which may be accompanied by dysarthria and disturbances of equilibrium.
ophthalmic migraine  migraine accompanied by amblyopia, teichopsia, or other visual disturbance.
ophthalmoplegic migraine  periodic migraine accompanied by ophthalmoplegia.
retinal migraine  a type of ophthalmic migraine with retinal symptoms, probably secondary to constriction of one or more retinal arteries.

migraine

[mī′grān]
Etymology: Gk, hemi, half, kranion, skull
a recurring headache characterized by unilateral onset, severe throbbing pain, photophobia, phonophobia, and autonomic disturbances during the acute phase, which may last for hours or days. The disorder occurs more frequently in women than in men, and a predisposition to migraine may be inherited. The exact mechanism responsible for the disorder is not known, but the head pain may be related to dilation of extracranial blood vessels, which may be the result of chemical changes that cause spasms of intracranial vessels. Allergic reactions, excess carbohydrates, iodine-rich foods, alcohol, bright lights, or loud noises may trigger attacks, which often occur during a period of relaxation after physical or psychic stress. See also headache.
observations An impending attack may be heralded by visual disturbances, such as aura, flashing lights or wavy lines, or by a strange taste or odor, numbness, tingling, vertigo, tinnitus, or a feeling that part of the body is distorted in size or shape. The acute phase may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, chills, polyuria, sweating, facial edema, irritability, and extreme fatigue. After an attack the individual often has dull head and neck pains and a great need for sleep.
interventions Ergotamine tartrate preparations that constrict cranial arteries can usually prevent the headache from developing if administered early in the onset via injection, suppository, tablet, or nasal spray. Ergotamine tartrate is also available in combination with other drugs, such as caffeine, phenobarbital, and belladonna. Migraine patients unable to tolerate ergot preparations may use other analgesics, including acetaminophen, NSAIDs, triptan, and propoxyphene. If headaches happen frequently, a prophylactic medication may be taken daily.

migraine

An intense idiopathic, episodic, uni/bilateral, pulsating (vascular) headache, often exacerbated by physical activity, linked to dilation of branches of the carotid artery.

Clinical findings
Classic migraines are most common in women age 30–49 and in lower income households, and appear to have a hereditary component. Migraines first appear before puberty and remit at menopause; they may be accompanied or preceded by nausea, vomiting, phonophobia, and photophobia or other visual phenomena (e.g., hemianopia, scotomas, fortification phenomenon).

Management
Analgesics (e.g., aspirin, acetaminophen, propoxyphen, codeine), NSAIDs (e.g., naproxen, ibuprofen, ketorolac), 5-HT agonists (e.g., ergotamine, sumatryptan), dopamine antagonist (e.g., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide).
 
Prevention
Avoid precipitating factors; if conservative measures fail and the attacks are > 1/week, pharmacologic prophylaxis is indicated, which may be 5-HT influencing (e.g., amitriptyline, methysergide1), β-adrenergic antagonist (e.g., propranolol, metoprolol), calcium channel blocker (e.g., nifedipine, verapamil) or NSAIDs (e.g., ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, aspirin).

migraine

Hemicrania, sick headache Neurology An intense idiopathic, episodic, uni/bilateral, pulsating–vascular headache, often exacerbated by physical activity, linked to dilation of branches of the carotid artery Clinical 'Classic' migraines are most common in ♀ age 30-49, and in lower income households, and appear to have a hereditary component; migraines first appear before puberty and remit at menopause; they may be accompanied or preceded by N&V, photophobia, other visual phenomena–eg, hemianopia, scotomas, fortification phenomenon, phonophobia Treatment Analgesics–eg, aspirin, acetaminophen, propoxyphen, codeine, NSAIDs–eg, naproxen, ibuprofen, ketorolac, 5-HT agonists–eg, ergotamine, sumatryptan, dopamine antagonist–eg, chlorpromazine, metoclopramide Prevention Avoid precipitating factors; if conservative measures fail and the attacks are > 1/wk, pharmacologic prophylaxis is indicated, which may be 5-HT-influencing–eg, amitriptyline, methysergide, β-adrenergic antagonist–eg, propranolol, metoprolol, calcium channel blocker–eg, nifedipine, verapamil, NSAIDs–eg, ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, aspirin, sumatriptan. See Aura, Basilar migraine, Classical migraine, Common migraine, Footballer's headache, Menstrual migraine, Mixed tension, Ophthalmoplegic migraine, Retinal migraine.

mi·graine

(mī'grān)
A symptom complex occurring periodically and characterized by pain in the head (usually unilateral), vertigo, nausea and vomiting, and photophobia. Onset of pain may be preceded by a warning (i.e., aura), often consisting of bilateral scintillating scotomas. Subtypes include classic migraine, common migraine, cluster headache, hemiplegic migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine, and ophthalmic migraine.
Synonym(s): hemicrania (1) , sick headache.
[through O. Fr., fr. G. hēmi-krania, pain on one side of the head, fr. hēmi-, half, + kranion, skull]

migraine

A particular form of headache caused by widening (dilatation) of some of the arteries of the scalp and brain, usually on one side. The widening is preceded by partial closure of these arteries (spasm) and this often causes temporary disturbance of brain function. Most commonly, this takes the form of an expanding, one-sided blank area in the field of vision, with a sparkling (scintillating) jagged border. Such an episode usually lasts for about 20 min. Other neurological disturbances may occur, such as weakness or loss of sensation on the face or down one side of the body or speech or comprehension defects. The headache that follows these effects may be severe and there is nausea and sometimes vomiting and great intolerance to light. Migraine is treated with various drugs including ergotamine tartrate, beta-blockers such as PROPRANOLOL, antidepressants such as amitryptyline, and the serotonin antagonist METHYSERGIDE. The term migraine comes from the words ‘hemi-cranial’, meaning half-head.

Migraine

A throbbing headache that usually affects only one side of the head. Nausea, vomiting, increased sensitivity to light, and other symptoms often accompany migraine.

migraine,

n a type of severe headache; often recurring and characterized by sudden onset on one side of the head or face, with acute pain and sensitivity to light and noise.
migraine, atypical (āˈ·tiˑ·pi·kl mīˑ·grān)),
n a headache without an aura and tending to be less unilateral than classical migraines. Also called
common migraine.
migraine, classic,
n a condition characterized by painful headache often accompanied by an aura (a visual, motor, or cognitive phenomenon that prefaces the headache).
migraine, common,
n a condition characterized by painful headache that is not accompanied by an aura. See also migraine, classic.

migraine

An intense and recurring pain usually confined to one side of the head and often accompanied by vertigo, nausea and vomiting, photophobia and scintillating appearances of light and even hemianopia. See visual aura; metamorphopsia; scintillating scotoma.

mi·graine

(mī'grān)
A familial, recurrent syndrome usually characterized by unilateral head pain, accompanied by various focal disturbances of the nervous system, particularly in regard to visual phenomenon, e.g., scintillating scotomas.

migraine,

n See headache, migraine.

Patient discussion about migraine

Q. what is migraine???

A. this is a disease

Q. What the reasons to the migraine?

A. A migraine headache has many triggers- among which are different foods (cheese, red wine), drinking coffee or caffeine containing beverages, lack of sleep, smoking, drinking alcohol, exposure to strong noise and more. There is also a genetic factor, and you see migraine more in people whose relatives suffer from it too.

Q. What Is a Migraine? I have these headaches and my doctor says it sounds like I’m suffering from migraines. What exactly are migraines?

A.
A migraine is a situation that generally combines a headache with certain characteristics, such as increased sensitivity to light, pulsating pain, usually only one sided and that lasts no longer than 72 hours. It is usually a phenomenon that runs in the family, and sometimes can be very difficult to overcome. Here are some tips about dealing with a migraine- http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-Treat-Headaches-21797151

More discussions about migraine
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared with the 151 subjects who didn't use any acute antimigraine medication, those who used single analgesics for that purpose had an adjusted 61% lower risk of progressing to chronic headache.
An important drawback of the drugs used as antimigraine is the high occurrence of side effects.
Moreover, movement to later lines of acute therapy among the approved antimigraine drugs queried typically involves a switch in treatment-these therapies are rarely prescribed as part of regimen.
ZOMIG-ZMT is an orange-flavored, orally disintegrating antimigraine prescription product utilizing CIMA's DuraSolv(R) fast-dissolve drug delivery system, which dissolves on the tongue in seconds without the need for additional liquids.
Only 12 (28%) patients in the migraine group used specific antimigraine medications such as triptans.
Nasdaq:CIMA) today announced that AstraZeneca (NYSE:AZN) has received regulatory approval from Japan's Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare for Zomig(R) RM(TM), an orally disintegrating antimigraine compound incorporating CIMA's DuraSolv(R) fast-dissolve drug delivery system with AstraZeneca's active drug ingredient, zolmitriptan.
8 Global Antimigraine Drugs Market Segmentation of Global Central Nervous System Drugs Market Five Forces Analysis 05.
Other than ergot drugs (contraindicated) and amitriptyline (concern for long-term neurotoxicity), all antimigraine agents appear to be compatible with breast-feeding.
Virtually all other antimigraine drugs have weight gain as a prominent side effect, according to Dr.
The most successful reformulations and emerging therapies in existing drug classes will be abuse- and dependence-resistant strong opioid formulations, including King Pharmaceuticals/Pain Therapeutics' Remoxy; as well as safer and more tolerable NSAID formulations such as NicOx's naproxcinod and AstraZeneca/POZEN's naproxen/esomeprazole combination; Johnson & Johnson's new dual-acting opioid tapentadol; and longer lasting antimigraine formulations such as GlaxoSmithKline's Treximet.
08 times more likely to have been prescribed lithium within the last 60 days than were control subjects after adjustment for 12 confounding variables: age: sex; residence in Canada; previous involvement in an injurious motor vehicle crash; chronic disease score; and exposure to antidepressants, antiepileptics, benzodiazepines, antipsychotics, antimigraine drugs, muscle relaxants, or narcotic analgesics in the 60 days before the accident.
market launch of Zomig-ZMT(TM) (zolmitriptan), an orally disintegrating antimigraine compound incorporating CIMA's DuraSolv(TM) fast-dissolve drug delivery system with AstraZeneca's active drug ingredient, zolmitriptan.