antifungal

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antifungal

 [an″te-, an″ti-fung´gal]
destructive to or checking the growth of fungi; called alsoantimycotic.
antifungal agent.

an·ti·my·cot·ic

(an'tē-mī-kot'ik),
Antagonistic to fungi.
Synonym(s): antifungal
[anti- + G. mykēs, fungus]

antifungal

/an·ti·fun·gal/ (-fung´gal)
1. destructive to fungi, or suppressing their reproduction or growth; effective against fungal infections.
2. an agent that so acts.

antifungal

(ăn′tē-fŭng′gəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the growth of fungi.
n.
An antifungal drug.

antifungal

[-fung′gəl]
1 pertaining to a substance that kills fungi or inhibits their growth or reproduction.
2 an antifungal, antibiotic drug. Amphotericin B and ketoconazole, both effective against a broad spectrum of fungi, probably act by binding to sterols in the fungal plasma membrane and changing the membrane's permeability. Griseofulvin, another broad-spectrum antifungal agent, binds to the host's new keratin and renders it resistant to further fungal invasion. Miconazole nitrate inhibits the growth of common dermatophytes, including yeastlike Candida albicans; nystatin is effective against yeast and yeastlike fungi. Also called antimycotic.

antifungal

adjective Referring to an effect that kills or inhibits fungal growth.

noun Any agent that kills or inhibits fungal growth.

antifungal

adjective Referring to an effect that kills or inhibits fungal growth noun An agent that kills or inhibits fungal growth

an·ti·my·cot·ic

(an'tē-mī-kot'ik)
Antagonistic to fungi.
[anti- + G. mykēs, fungus]

antifungal

Effective in the treatment or control of fungus infections.

Antifungal

A medicine used to treat infections caused by a fungus.

antifungal,

adj/n effective against fungi in the body; beneficial property of some essential oils, such as fennel, cinnamon, clove, and thyme.

an·ti·my·cot·ic

(an'tē-mī-kot'ik)
Antagonistic to fungi.
Synonym(s): antifungal.
[anti- + G. mykēs, fungus]

antifungal

1. destructive to or checking the growth of fungi.
2. an agent that destroys or checks the growth of fungi, such as amphotericin B or flucytosine (5-FC). Includes: (1) topical drugs, e.g. undecylenic acid, benzoic acid, salicylic acid, tolnaftate, candicidin, haloprogin, iodochlorhydroxyquin, cuprimyxin, clotrimazole, thiabendazole and miconazole; (2) systemic drugs, e.g. griseofulvin, amphotericin b, 5-flucytosine and ketoconazole.
References in periodicals archive ?
Susceptibility to antifungal drugs was defined according to clinical break points for C.
By combining their antimicrobial polymers with conventional antibiotics or antifungal drugs, they were able to induce the formation of pores in microbial membranes, which promotes the penetration of antibiotics into the microbial cells, and kills highly infectious, drug-resistant P.
Feasibility of using collagen as the base of the antifungal drug, miconazole.
Limited classes of available antifungal drugs, rising resistance, and a shortage of drugs in the research pipeline point to a critical need for new antifungal drugs with novel modes of action," said Hecht.
Deep fungus infection drugs are always the driving force of the antifungal drug market, with the increasing market share year by year.
Treatment of fungal infections currently available in the market can be broadly classified into four major classes of antifungal drugs - Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins.
Commenting on his appointment, Dr Michael Hodges said "I am delighted to be joining the Board of Directors, especially at such an exciting time for the company as they move their series of novel antifungal drug candidates into the clinic".
Another reason behind why they are so excited about their findings is that the most widely used antifungal drug that can be given orally slows the growth of fungus cells but it doesn't kill them, which means that patients whose immune systems are compromised may have trouble completely fighting off the infections.
Molecular typing by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and antifungal drug susceptibility testing were performed on clinical and environmental isolates recovered from our hospital from 1999 to 2003.
responded by sending 600,000 mailgrams to health care professionals, informing them of "rare cases of serious cardiovascular adverse events" following use of the drug, especially in patients also taking the antifungal drug ketoconazole or the antibiotic erythromycin.
The report also provides an up-to-date extensive list of companies engaged in antibacterial and antifungal drug discovery and lists some of the novel scientific approaches being taken, including chemical biology, toxicogenomics, and computational approaches.