antiarrhythmic

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antiarrhythmic

 [an″te-ah-rith´mik]
1. preventing or alleviating cardiac arrhythmias.
2. an agent that has this effect.

an·ti·ar·rhyth·mic

(an'tē-ă-ridh'mik),
Combating an arrhythmia.
Synonym(s): antidysrhythmic

antiarrhythmic

/an·ti·ar·rhyth·mic/ (-ah-rith´mik)
1. preventing or alleviating cardiac arrhythmias.
2. an agent that so acts.

antiarrhythmic

(ăn′tē-ə-rĭth′mĭk, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Preventing or alleviating irregularities in the force or rhythm of the heart.
n.
An antiarrhythmic drug.

antiarrhythmic

[-ərith′mik]
Etymology: Gk, anti + rhythmos, rhythm
1 pertaining to a procedure or substance that prevents, alleviates, or corrects an abnormal cardiac rhythm.
2 an antiarrhythmic agent. A defibrillator that delivers a precordial electric shock is often used to restore a normal rhythm to rapid, irregular atrial or ventricular contractions. A pacemaker may be implanted in a patient with an extremely slow heart rate or another arrhythmia. The electrode catheter of an external pacemaker may be threaded through a vein to the heart in cases of ventricular standstill or complete heart block. The major antiarrhythmic drugs are lidocaine hydrochloride, and a combination of disopyramide phosphate, procainamide hydrochloride, and quinidine. The antiadrenergic blocking agent propranolol hydrochloride may be used in treating arrhythmias. Isoproterenol hydrochloride is indicated for complete heart block and ventricular arrhythmias requiring an increased force of cardiac contractions to establish a normal rhythm. Atropine may be used in the treatment of bradycardia, a sedative in the treatment of tachycardia, and digitalis in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Calcium channel blockers control arrhythmias by inhibiting calcium ion influx across the plasma membrane of cardiac muscle, thus slowing atrioventricular conduction and prolonging the effective refractory period within the AV node. See also arrhythmia.

antiarrhythmic

adjective Referring to an agent or mechanism that counters cardiac arrhythmias noun An agent that prevents or ameliorates cardiac arrhythmias

antiarrhythmic

1. preventing or alleviating cardiac arrhythmias.
2. an agent that prevents or alleviates cardiac arrhythmias.

antiarrhythmic drugs
include quinidine, procainamide, lidocaine, beta-adrenergic blockers such as propranolol, autonomic drugs including atropine and epinephrine, and digitalis.
References in periodicals archive ?
For any given antiarrhythmic agent, there was at least one trial with a minimum of 6 months follow-up time.
The fact is that sales of antiarrhythmic agents for use in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have not declined.
SAN FRANCISCO -- A host of antiarrhythmic agents for termination or prevention of atrial fibrillation are in the developmental pipeline.
Quiidine is no longer the bad boy of antiarrhythmic agents," he declared.
For that reason, it is now recommended that all patients who start a class I or class III antiarrhythmic agent spend several days in the hospital on continuous ECG monitoring.
As class I antiarrhythmic agents are potent sodium-channel blockers, most of them are contraindicated in patients who have Brugada syndrome.
The risk of proarrhythmia is present with antiarrhythmic agents, and clinicians are cautioned to assess risk versus benefit before starting any of the agents.
Intraoperative events included hypotension and tachycardia was prevented with antiarrhythmic agents and transfusion with a plasma expander and crystalloid fluid.
JOHN'S WORT Paroxetine Nausea, Lethargy, Incoherence Class IA and III Decreases effectiveness antiarrhythmic agents (precipitating arrhythmias) Cyclosporine Decreases cyclosporine concentration due to increased clearance (transplant rejection) Theophylline Decreases serum concentration YOHIMBINE Clonidine, Guanabenz Decreases blood pressure reduction effect of centrally active agents CNS stimulants (e.
Antiarrhythmic agents are contraindicated in the setting of heart failure, so there is a great need for drugs that will work "upstream"--that is, on the aberrant substrate that gives rise to AF.
But the antiarrhythmic agents that are often needed to achieve sinus rhythm are not associated with higher rates of survival.
One should exercise great caution during use of antiarrhythmic agents in patients with heart block.