holism

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ho·lism

(hō'lizm),
1. The principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through the analysis of a phenomenon as a complete entity in itself. Compare: atomism.
[G. holos, entire]

holism

/hol·ism/ (hōl´izm) the conception of man as a functioning whole.holis´tic

holism

(hō′lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory that living matter or reality is made up of organic or unified wholes that are greater than the simple sum of their parts.
2. A holistic investigation or system of treatment.

ho′list n.

holism

[hō′lizəm]
Etymology: Gk, holos, whole
a philosophical concept in which an entity is seen as more than the sum of its parts. Holism is prominent in current approaches to psychology; biology; nursing; medicine; and other scientific, sociological, and educational fields of study and practice. Also spelled wholism.

holism

Psychiatry An approach to the study of the individual in totality, rather than as an aggregate of separate physiologic, psychologic, and social characteristics

ho·lism

(hō'lizm)
1. Principle that an organism, or one of its actions, is not equal to merely the sum of its parts but must be perceived or studied as a whole.
2. The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis as a complete entity in itself.
[G. holos, entire]

holism (hōˑ·li·zm),

n 1. the characteristic of being whole, complete, interconnected, indivisible, ordered. In medicine the concept is used to address the entire individual and context rather than focusing only on a part or diagnosis.
2. in biology, the concept according to which the sum of a phenomenon or system cannot be measured, reduced, or observed at the level below that of the entire system.
References in periodicals archive ?
If we replace the two occurrences of "corporation" (in this last sentence) with "group," we will get a general denial of the anti-reductionist approach that Dworkin represents.
It doesn't follow from this anti-reductionist approach, however, that one cannot make intelligible statements about issues within knowledge, but only that what can be said 'will itself ineliminably employ the concept of knowledge, and not in a merely preparatory fashion prior to a definition or elimination of knowledge' (73).
49) Weiss, instead, makes use of a "well entrenched anti-reductionist method.

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