antihypertensive

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Related to Anti-hypertensive: antihypertensive drugs

antihypertensive

 [an″te-, an″ti-hi″per-ten´siv]
effective against hypertension.
antihypertensive agent an agent that reduces high blood pressure; there are many different types of drugs that do this. diuretics inhibit the reabsorption of sodium in the renal tubules, causing an increase in urinary excretion of sodium and a decrease in the plasma volume and extracellular fluid volume. Drugs that act on adrenergic control of blood pressure include beta-adrenergic blocking agents such as propranolol, which act at beta-adrenergic receptors in the heart and kidneys to reduce cardiac output and renin secretion, and others such as methyldopa that act on alpha-adrenergic mechanisms in the central or sympathetic nervous system to reduce peripheral vascular resistance. vasodilators act directly on the arterioles to produce the same effect. Almost every case of hypertension can be controlled by one of these drugs or a combination of them. The proper combination is determined by the response of the individual patient. In some cases several drugs must be tried before the right combination is found.
Patient Education. Instruction of the patient and significant others is an essential part of antihypertensive therapy. Learning objectives are based on the patient's particular regimen of drug therapy, allowance of sodium intake, and other dietary restrictions, such as a low-calorie diet to combat obesity.

Some antihypertensive drugs can produce acute hypotensive reactions. The patient will need to know how to prevent a hypotensive reaction and what measures to take should such a reaction occur.

Prevention of a hypotensive reaction includes avoiding hot baths and sudden immobility after exercise, both of which promote vasodilation and a lowering of arterial pressure. The patient also should be aware of the effect of sudden changes in position that can precipitate an attack of orthostatic hypotension. Pooling of blood in the lower limbs can divert it from the brain and other vital organs. This can sometimes be avoided by moving about frequently instead of standing motionless for long periods of time. Elastic stockings also help promote venous return from the legs and help prevent fainting from decreased cerebral blood supply.

Acute hypotension can be serious, but milder hypotensive reactions with faintness and weakness can be relieved at home if the patient lies down and elevates his lower extremities above the level of his head and flexes the thigh muscles to encourage the flow of blood from his feet and legs to his brain.

The patient on a diuretic that is not potassium-sparing will need instruction on the symptoms of potassium deficit, how to avoid potassium depletion, and when to notify the doctor should hypokalemia occur.

Limitation of sodium intake can be very confusing and emotionally stressful to the uninstructed patient. In order to comply with the prescribed restriction of sodium the patient will need to know about satisfying substitutes and alternative seasonings for food, to be aware of the necessity of reading labels carefully when buying prepared food and over-the-counter medications, and to recognize the relationship between sodium and high blood pressure and the reasons why high sodium intake is harmful to health and well-being.

an·ti·hy·per·ten·sive

(an'tē-hī-per-ten'siv),
Indicating a drug or mode of treatment that reduces the blood pressure of hypertensive patients.

antihypertensive

/an·ti·hy·per·ten·sive/ (-ten´siv) counteracting high blood pressure, or an agent that does this.

antihypertensive

(ăn′tē-hī′pər-tĕn′sĭv, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Reducing or controlling high blood pressure.
n.
An antihypertensive drug.

antihypertensive

[-hī·pərten′siv]
1 pertaining to a substance or procedure that reduces high blood pressure.
2 an antihypertensive agent. Various drugs achieve their antihypertensive effect by depleting tissue stores of catecholamines in peripheral sites, by stimulating pressor receptors in the carotid sinus and heart, by blocking autonomic nerve impulses that constrict blood vessels, by stimulating central inhibitory alpha2 receptors, or by causing vasodilation. Thiazides and other diuretic agents inhibit the reabsorption of sodium in the renal tubules, increasing urinary excretion of sodium and decreasing plasma and extracellular fluid volume, decreasing blood volume. Drugs that act on adrenergic control of blood pressure include beta-adrenergic blocking agents, which act at beta-adrenergic receptors in the heart and kidneys to reduce cardiac output and renin secretion; and others that act on alpha-adrenergic mechanisms in the central or sympathetic nervous system to reduce peripheral vascular resistance. Vasodilatators act directly on the arterioles to produce the same effect. Other drugs used to treat hypertension are HCl, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, nonnitrate vasodilators, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Almost every case of hypertension can be controlled by one of these drugs or a combination of them. The proper combination is determined by the response of the individual. In some cases, several drugs must be tried before the right combination is found. Compare antihypotensive.

antihypertensive

adjective Referring to an agent or mechanism that counters hypertension.

noun An agent used to manage hypertension.

antihypertensive

adjective Referring to an agent or mechanism that reduces HTN noun An agent used to manage HTN

an·ti·hy·per·ten·sive

(an'tē-hī-pĕr-ten'siv)
Indicating a drug or mode of treatment that reduces the blood pressure of people with hypertension.

antihypertensive

1. Acting against high blood pressure (HYPERTENSION).
2. A drug used in the treatment of high blood pressure.

Antihypertensive

Used to describe drugs or treatments designed to control hypertension, or high blood pressure.
Mentioned in: Hyperaldosteronism

antihypertensive,

n a medicine or substance that reduces blood pressure.

an·ti·hy·per·ten·sive

(an'tē-hī-pĕr-ten'siv)
Indicating a drug or treatment that reduces the blood pressure of hypertensive patients.

antihypertensive

acting to reduce tension; in medical terms, usually referring to elevated blood pressure. Drugs used for this purpose include diuretics, β-adrenergic antagonists, and vasodilators.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, we cannot attribute this significant change due to ACE inhibitors or other anti-hypertensive alone as the patients were on concurrent anti-diabetic medication such as insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents.
They can be used alone or as a second-line therapy in combination with a wide range of anti-hypertensive drugs.
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Careful monitoring of blood pressure at home can provide valuable data on your usual blood pressure, and help your doctor evaluate the effects of anti-hypertensive (high blood pressure) medication intended to protect your brain from a damaging stroke.
After the boy stopped eating the sweets, his anti-hypertensive treatment was gradually reduced and his blood pressure returned to normal.
Researchers suggested that the doctors of obese patients may be quicker to put those patients on anti-hypertensive medications because the need to control risk factors appeared to be more urgent.
This is the first study to consider gender as an element in the selection of anti-hypertensive agents or base the choice of a specific drug on the various factors accounting for the elevation in blood pressure," added Ferrario.
CVRx recently launched the Barostim neo, its second-generation implantable anti-hypertensive barostimulation device in Europe.