aromatase inhibitor

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aromatase inhibitor

n. Abbr. AI
Any of several drugs that affect the levels of steroids in the blood by inhibiting the enzyme aromatase. Aromatase inhibitors are used especially to lower estrogen levels to control the growth or prevent the recurrence of estrogen-sensitive tumors in post-menopausal women with breast cancer.

aromatase inhibitor

Any of a class of drugs that block the synthesis of estrogen in the body. A number of these agents have been developed to treat breast cancer, which is often a hormone-responsive malignancy.
See also: inhibitor
References in periodicals archive ?
Of those, 12 had received anti-estrogen therapy and 28 had not, reported Dr.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Findings of a new study, presented at the CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, revealed that anti-estrogens as therapy for breast cancer may also reduce the risk of death from lung cancer.
If estrogen and/or progesterone receptors are present, then it is likely that the patient will be treated with anti-estrogen therapy, also called hormonal therapy.
For this reason, anti-estrogen drugs such as tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors have come to the forefront in the fight against hormone-dependent breast cancer.
Translated" from basic research in molecular biology, these approaches include new/ improved anti-estrogen and targeted chemotherapeutic and biologic therapies.
a professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California in San Diego, reported that women whose breast cancer came back after treatment had almost twice as much estrogen in their blood than did women who remained cancer-free--despite treatment with anti-estrogen drugs in most of the women.
Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity are probably the most well studied however chemicals with anti-estrogen, androgen, anti-androgen, progesterone, or thyroid-like activity have also been identified.
This anti-estrogen was described as blocking classic ER-mediated actions in vivo (Johnson et al.
These cancers rely on estrogen to grow, so anti-estrogen therapies aim to cut off their fuel supply.
In 1999, Aromasin was approved in Europe through Mutual Recognition Procedure for treatment of advanced breast cancer after prior anti-estrogen therapy.
Prof Nicholson added: "Tamoxifen is an anti-estrogen drug, so it blocks off the amount of estrogen in the body.