discrimination

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Related to Anti-discrimination: Anti-Discrimination Policy, Anti-discrimination laws

discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

discrimination

/dis·crim·i·na·tion/ (-krim″ĭ-na´shun) the making of a fine distinction.

discrimination

[diskrim′inā′shən]
Etymology: L, discrimen, division
the act of distinguishing or differentiating. The ability to distinguish between touch or pressure at two nearby points on the body is known as two-point discrimination.

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
From this perspective, it seems more than a little odd to argue that restrictions on hate speech, which show respect for equal citizenship and help to mitigate the racism of an illegitimate system should not be enacted for fear that such restrictions would undermine the legitimacy of anti-discrimination legislation, legislation which also shows respect for equal citizenship and helps to mitigate the racism of an illegitimate system.
awareness and understanding of the DIFC's anti-discrimination framework.
The possibilities lie in the fact that attribute-based protection in the FW Act offers employees, in some circumstances, a refreshingly simple alternative to overly complicated anti-discrimination laws.
However, in view of the great difficulties some of these groups experience in the job market, active anti-discrimination policy may be the only strategy that has the power to effect change.
The lawsuit seeks an order requiring the construction of the ramp, anti-discrimination training of Leisure Woods Estates employees on anti-discrimination and fair housing laws, future compliance with anti-discrimination laws, and monetary damages paid to the homeowner.
In working with Bar President Meenu Sasser on the Palm Beach County Bar Association's And Justice for All project, I learned that the association did not have an anti-discrimination policy," said civil rights lawyer Rand Hoch, who serves on the association's Diversity and Gender Sensitivity Committee.
This exemption specifies that any position in a church or other place of worship is exempt from any civil actions under the anti-discrimination law when employing people in positions such as clergy, religious instructors and support staff.
When the state of Massachusetts required the church to follow anti-discrimination laws in order to receive public dollars, the Boston Archdiocese stopped doing adoptions altogether.
It was one of the first anti-discrimination laws in the nation and has been amended 10 times since then.
In The Pursuit of Fairness, Texas A&M historian Terry Anderson has produced what he calls "a balanced history of affirmative action" in the United States; it bills itself as an authoritative account of the rise of anti-discrimination and racial-preference policies.
Council officials are afraid that the sessions breach anti-discrimination rules.
Other organizations involved are the American-Arab Anti-discrimination Committee, Greenpeace, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, and United for Peace and Justice.