sinophobia

(redirected from Anti-Chinese sentiment)
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sinophobia

Morbid fear of the Chinese, and of Chinese culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the time, anti-Chinese sentiment was growing in California and in the nation.
In addition to economic competition, public health issues were racialized to fuel anti-Chinese sentiment in San Francisco.
These are not just important historically, but offer sophisticated ways to question recent events in Southeast Asian history, like the struggle over East Timor, the military crackdown in Burma, the neo-royalist revolution in Thailand, and anti-Chinese sentiment in Malaysia and Indonesia.
Beginning with the Dutch classification of ethnic Chinese as "Foreign Orientals," anti-Chinese sentiment has had a long history in Indonesia.
Wang describes the mission work during this rime as follows: although church leaders and missionaries often attributed their lack of success to a chronic lack of financial and human resources, the real reason was the anti-Chinese sentiment that always cast a shadow over the missions (66).
In cities such as San Francisco, public health officials helped fan anti-Chinese sentiment to pass the country's first urban segregation laws restricting the spread of Chinatown, and at one point even threatened to remove the whole Chinese population to an industrial suburb.
The cases of Yee and two other arrested Americans who worked at Guantanamo provide a clever diversion calculated to heighten Americans' sense of vulnerability and further incite anti-Muslim and anti-Chinese sentiment at a time when many Americans and lawmakers in Congress are beginning to question Bush's costly military occupation of Iraq.
But the anti-Chinese sentiment in America that traces back to the frontier days remains a constant friction.
In 1911, anti-Chinese sentiment led to legislation banning their methods.
On the political front, the government may find itself hard pressed to calm nationalist, anti-Chinese sentiment, as well as demands for political liberalisation.
In the worst case, anti-Chinese sentiment could rise among Japanese, precipitating a fall into a downward spiral like when former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi visited Yasukuni Shrine.
Research on anti-Chinese sentiment in Toronto traces its origins to negative stereotypes about the Chinese created by missionary propaganda, Canadian popular literature, and American publications before the Chinese arrived and became concentrated there.