Hominidae

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Ho·min·i·dae

(hō-min'i-dē),
The primate family, which includes modern humans (Homo sapiens) and several fossil groups.
The primate family that contains Homo sapiens and both ancestral and collateral—but extinct—species. Hominidae may have resulted from many different selective pressures—e.g., bioenergetic, migratory, morphologic—nd thermoregulatory considerations associated with foraging and feeding behaviour, as well as aspects of life history patterns and social systems

Hominidae

(hō-mŏn′ĭ-dē) [L. homo, man, + Gr. ideos, pert. to]
A family of primates that includes ancient and modern humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
There seems to be an urgent need to establish a research station for anthropomorphic simian observation to which researchers could arrive without much difficulty, with favorable climate conditions for anthropoid apes, a guaranteed supply of the cheapest materials possible, and that allows, if feasible, for the joint study of Asian and African anthropoid apes, so that their mental lives and activities can be compared .
In 1913, he conducted an array of studies, examining several aspects of natural behavior in anthropoid apes, especially gestural language in chimpanzees as a precursor to human language.
Pfungst's conclusion was surprisingly consistent with Thorndike's ideas: anthropoid apes can be considered intelligent considering that they learned faster, formed more complex associations, and retained those associations longer (Pfungst, 1912).
They were simultaneously engaged in studies of insight of anthropoid apes, Koehler [sic] using chimpanzees at the Canary Island Station, the writer observing an orang-utan [sic] at the private laboratory of G.
All anthropoid apes of the present day can stand erect and move about on their feet alone, but only in the case of need and in a very clumsy way.