Bacillus anthracis

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Related to Anthracis: Anthrax disease, woolsorters disease

Ba·cil·lus an·thra·cis

a bacterial species that causes anthrax in humans, cattle, swine, sheep, rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice; contains virulence plasmids associated with capsule and toxin production.
See: anthrax.

Bacillus anthracis

a species of gram-positive, facultative anaerobe that causes anthrax, a disease primarily of cattle and sheep. The spores of this organism, if inhaled, can cause a pulmonary form of anthrax. Spores can live for many years in animal products, such as hides and wool, and in soil. See also anthrax, woolsorter's disease.
A gram-positive organism which causes often fatal infections when its endospores—resistant to heat, drying, UV light, gamma radiation, and many disinfectants—enter the body and cause septicemia
Military medicine B anthracis has been touted as a viable biological weapon; it was used only once, by the Japanese army in Manchuria in the 1940s

Bacillus anthracis

Infectious disease A gram-positive organism which causes often fatal infections when its endospores–resistant to heat, drying, UV light, gamma radiation, and many disinfectants–enter the body and cause septicemia Military medicine B anthracis has been touted as a viable biological weapon; it was used only once, by the Japanese army in Manchuria in the 1940s. See Anthrax, Biological warfare.

Ba·cil·lus an·thra·cis

(bă-silŭs an-thrāsis)
A bacterial species that causes anthrax in humans and animals; used in bioterrorism.

Ba·cil·lus an·thra·cis

(bă-silŭs an-thrāsis)
Bacterial species that causes anthrax in humans, cattle, swine, and other animals.

Bacillus

a genus of bacteria that are gram-positive, aerobic, spore-forming rods. With the exception of B. anthracis and the occasional wound contamination and bovine mastitis caused by B. cereus, the organisms are largely saprophytic and do not cause disease. However, they may invade devitalized tissue. They do have importance in the area of food preservation.

Bacillus actinoides
streptobacillusmoniliformis.
Bacillus aneurinolyticus, Bacillus thiaminolyticus
are thiaminase-producing bacteria which may proliferate in the rumen and contribute to the cerebral lesions in carbohydrate engorgement and polioencephalomalacia in cattle.
Bacillus anthracis
characterized by its capacity to form spores when exposed to the air and to survive for long periods in soil and other inert materials. Has a characteristic appearance with McFadyean's stain. Causes anthrax in all species.
Bacillus brevis
the source of tyrothricin.
Bacillus cereus
a species causing food poisoning, occasional cases of septicemia and bovine mastitis and abortion.
Bacillus circulans, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus
very heat-resistant bacteria which cause fermentation of cereals in canned meat foods. They cause souring but no gas production so that the can does not bulge. Called also flat sour. B. stearothermophilus spores are used to test efficacy of autoclaves.
Bacillus larvae
the cause of American foulbrood in honeybees.
Bacillus licheniformis
reported as a cause of abortion in cattle, sheep and pigs, and also isolated from suppurative lesions of horses and cattle.
Bacillus piliformis
the previous name of clostridiumpiliforme, the cause of tyzzer's disease.
Bacillus polymyxa (Bacillus aerosporus)
strains of this organism are the source of the antibiotic polymyxin.
Bacillus subtilis
a common saprophytic soil and water form, often occurring as a laboratory contaminant, and rarely, in apparently causal relation to pathological processes, such as conjunctivitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
anthracis Sterne strain (34F2) (CDC, 2009) on stainless steel at ambient room temperature and elevated temperature (55[degrees]C) corresponding to below and above the boiling point of MeI.
anthracis infection in PWID compares clinical findings in survivors and nonsurvivors of this newly described form of infection.
Purified genomic DNA from strain B cereus Elc2 was analyzed for genes encoding protective antigen (pagA), edema factor (cya), and lethal factor (lef) encoded by plasmid pXO1 in B anthracis and pBCXO1 in B cereus strain G9241.
1] Pseudomonas aeruginosa 28 30 Bacillus anthracis 30 33 Klebsiella pneumonaie 22 25 E.
anthracis via gyrA in laboratory samples; however, when boil preps of these samples were used, TaqMan-MGB reliability diminished sharply.
anthracis (anthrax) and Pseudomonas pseudomallei (glanders) (1, 24, 25).
anthracis in the culture collection at NAU," Radnedge said.
anthracis Sterne) to 21 sequential subcultures in subinhibitory concentrations of doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, alatrofloxacin, and gatifloxacin.
anthracis depends on the presence of two large plasmids; strains lacking one or the other plasmid are not virulent.
This bacterium, Bacillus anthracis, is an endospore-forming rod, and it is these endospores that have the potential for causing anthrax infections in humans.
A: Anthrax is an infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis.
Bacillus anthracis is an aerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming, nonmotile Bacillus species.