Antabuse


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Antabuse

 [an´tah-būs]
trademark for a preparation of disulfiram, used in the treatment of alcoholism; it causes nausea and other distressing symptoms in persons who ingest alcohol while taking it.

Antabuse

(ăn′tə-byo͞os′)
A trademark for the drug disulfiram.

Antabuse

a trademark for an alcohol-use deterrent (disulfiram).

Antabuse®

Disulfuram, see there.

Antabuse

Disulfiram. A drug sometimes used in the management of alcoholism, which causes severe nausea and vomiting, sweating, breathlessness, headache and chest pain if any alcohol is taken after it has been given. Disulfiram inhibits the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase that breaks down acetaldehyde, a toxic metabolite of alcohol, so that this accumulates. The method is a form of aversion therapy and is not without danger of collapse and death from the toxic effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
You have to be cautious with new drugs because when Antabuse first came out, we thought it was a panacea," said Harris.
Subsequently, the alcoholic refrains from drinking when antabuse is ingested.
X, in excellent health and without physical complaints, requested a prescription for Antabuse, a medication causing alcohol aversion.
Conventional drug or alcohol rehabilitation such as 12-step programs or Antabuse to treat alcoholism may not work for the elderly who have some cognitive impairment, Dr.
German and Swiss medics have reported the case of a man who lost interest in betting after taking a drug called Antabuse.
A spokesperson said the star suffered an "equilibrium imbalance" when Antivert, which has side effects including drowsiness, dry mouth and blurred vision, reacted with the Antabuse medication he was taking to treat his alcoholism.
Q I'VE had an alcohol problem for years but heard a drug called antabuse can help me stop.
The pellets, known as Antabuse, release a chemical which, when mixed with alcohol, makes the patient physically sick.
George continued to drink despite having Antabuse implants in his stomach - a drug that is supposed to react violently with alcohol - and his liver was deteriorating.
The piano-mover is absorbed in all the minutiae of the cases he builds, and the former composer maintains a semifunctional numbness through drink, having given up attempts to withdraw from alcohol by taking Antabuse.
His boozing spiralled out of control despite the fact he had Antabuse pellets in his stomach that should have made him feel nauseous if he drank.
Best, who fell off the wagon recently, has had Antabuse tablets inserted into his stomach wall to keep him off the booze.