anise

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an·ise

(an'is),
The fruit of Pimpinellla anisum (family Umbelliferae); an aromatic and carminative resembling fennel.

anise

[an′is]
the fruit of the Pimpinella anisum plant. Extract of anise is used in the preparation of carminatives and expectorants.

an·ise

(an'is)
(Pimpinella anisum) An herbal extract that is marketed in many different forms. Unconfirmed uses include as a therapeutic agent in asthma, gastrointestinal disorders, and some forms of neurologic disease. Dangerous reactions have been reported.
[L. anisum, fr. G. anēson,]

anise (aˑ·ns),

n Latin name:
Pimpinella anisum; part used: fruit; uses: antibacterial, stimulant, antispasmodic, diuretic, diaphoretic, pulmonary ailments and disorders, sinus infections, colic, cancer, cholera, dysmenorrhea, sleep disorders, upset stomachs, nausea, lice, migraines, neuralgia, rashes; precautions: pregnancy, (essential oil) children, patients with liver or kidney disease; can cause seizures, edema in the lungs, hypermineralocorticism, stomatitis, nausea, and contact dermatitis. Also called
aniseed and
sweet cumin.

an·ise

(an'is)
Fruit of Pimpinellla anisum; an aromatic and carminative resembling fennel.
[L. anisum, fr. G. anēson,]

anise

dried seeds of the plant Pimpinella anisum of the family Umbelliferae. Anise oil is extracted and used as a flavoring, as a carminative and in broiler feeding as an appetizer. Has an attraction for animals and sometimes used as a decoy in traps. See also aniseed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of dietary antibiotic and anise oil supplementation on body weight, carcass characteristics and organoleptic analysis of meat in broiler.
Anise oil was characterized mainly by trans-anethol (89.
Used infrequently today, and only by prescription, the mixture contains about one percent morphine, with other ingredients including benzoic acid, camphor and anise oil.
Things like chocolate syrup, honey, brown sugar, shrimp oil, anise oil, garlic, DMSO, sardine oil, root beer syrup, WD-40, or some of the many other ingredients in which various guides soak their eggs.