anion

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anion

 [an´i-on]
an ion carrying a negative charge. adj., adj anion´ic.

an·i·on (A-),

(an'ī-on),
An ion that carries a negative charge, going therefore to the positively charged anode; in salts, acid radicals are anions.

anion

/an·ion/ (an´i-on) a negatively charged ion.anion´ic

anion

[an′ī·ən]
Etymology: Gk, ana + ion, backward going
a negatively charged ion that is attracted to the positive electrode (anode) in electrolysis. Compare cation. anionic, adj.

an·i·on

(A-) (an'ī-on)
An ion that carries a negative charge, going therefore to the positively charged anode; in salts, acid radicals are anions.

anion

A negatively charged ion that is attracted to an anode (positively-charged electrode), in electrolysis. Anions are usually shown as the second group in simple inorganic molecules, thus Cl- is the anion when common salt (NaCl) is dissociated in solution. Na+ is the CATION.

anion

a negatively charged ion that is attracted to the ANODE during electrolysis.

Anion

An ion carrying a negative charge owing to a surplus of electrons. Anions in the body include bicarbonate, chloride, phosphate, sulfate, certain organic acids, and certain protein compounds.

anion

a negatively charged ion, which is attracted to a positively charged anode, e.g. HSO4-, the anion of sulphuric acid

anion (aˑ·nēˈ·n),

n a negatively charged ion that is formed when an atom or a molecule gains one or more electrons. See also ion.

an·i·on

(Ā) (an'ī-on)
An ion that carries a negative charge, going therefore to the positively charged anode; in salts, acid radicals are anions.

anion (an´īən),

n a negatively charged ion.

anion

an ion carrying a negative charge. In an electrolytic cell anions are attracted to the positive electrode (anode).

anion-exchange resin
References in periodicals archive ?
Conditions of preparation and ion-exchange capacity of various PAN-silica gel anion exchange composite fibers.
4]+ excretion by the urine AG is unreliable when the urine contains significant amounts of bicarbonate or unusual anions, such as ketoacids or drugs, including penicillin or salicylate.
Vagnoni and Oetzel (1998) speculated that the reduction in feed intake for non-lactating dairy cows is likely caused by the acidogenic response to anion supplementation, rather than inherent poor palatability of supplemental acidogenic salts.
Comparison of Figs 4 and 5 shows clearly that the influence of halide anions on the corrosion of Ni is strongly dependent on the preparation of electrodes: the halide effects on the mechanically polished electrode are more intensive than on the chemically polished electrode.
Tren based amine hosts or macrocyclic receptors are able to recognize anions and characterize them by selectively binding to various anions[1].
Urine organic anions mmole OA/ Upper reference range Urine OA anion mole Cr mmole OA/L (mmole/mole Cr) 5-Oxoproline 8555 27 70 Aoetoaoetate 3386 11 7 3-Hydroxybutyrate 6176 20 17 2-Hydroxybutyrate 145 1 0 Lactate 195 0.
The renal plasma flow (RPF) was calculated as a clearance of PAH, an organic anion prototype and RBF was estimated from RPF/1-Hematocrit (Agarwal, 2002; Gehrig et al.
Small ions adapt to this situation by passive diffusion aiming at a balanced situation in which products of paired ions' concentrations (one anion and one cation) are equal on both membrane sides, under the condition that further water movement is prevented by the fixed volume of neighboring fluid departments.
Excretion of organic anions may solubilise P by changing the soil pH and by displacing P from adsorption sites.
Not until late last year did astronomers find the first example of a single negatively charged ion, or anion.
The anion gap is commonly used in clinical practice, especially in critically ill patients, as an approximation of the difference between the concentration of unmeasured anions and unmeasured cations in plasma.
Unmeasured weak anions (for example myeloma paraproteins) increase SIG by causing negative bias in SIDe.