ethology

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ethology

 [ĕ-thol´o-je]
the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state. adj., adj etholog´ical.

e·thol·o·gy

(ē-thol'ŏ-jē),
The study of animal behavior.
[G. ethos, character, habit, + logos, study]

ethology

/eth·ol·o·gy/ (e-thol´ah-je) the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state.etholog´ical

ethology

(ĭ-thŏl′ə-jē, ē-thŏl′-)
n.
1. The scientific study of animal behavior, especially as it occurs in a natural environment.
2. The study of human ethos and its formation.

eth′o·log′i·cal (ĕth′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
e·thol′o·gist n.

ethology

[ethol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, ethos, character, logos, science
1 (in zoology) the scientific study of the behavioral patterns of animals, specifically in their native habitat.
2 (in psychology) the empiric study of human behavior, primarily social customs, manners, and mores. ethologic, ethological, adj., ethologist, n.

ethology

the study of animal behaviour in the natural habitat of the animals concerned.

ethology

the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their report in the October ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR follows one published there in September by Holekamp, Laura Smale of Michigan State, and Paula White of the University of California, Berkeley.
When a wooden heron stalked the tadpoles in one compartment, those on the other side slowed down, moved away from the divider, and ducked under a shelter, the researchers report in the June ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR.
A report in the March ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, however, provides the first description of that behavior in a rodent, the authors say.
Lobsters seem more sophisticated, the researchers report in the December 1998 ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR.
In the November Animal Behaviour, they argue that their first experimental redesign of bowers supports the idea that courtship features evolved to let males act wildly enough to be alluring without scaring females away.
However, that view of the traits as pervasive throughout life's travails did not hold up in tests of more than 100 pumpkinseed sunfish, the researchers report in the October Animal Behaviour.
The reason may be that bigger males have more to lose, the authors speculate in the September Animal Behaviour.
In the August Animal Behaviour, the researchers argue that MHC "has a significant influence" on cues for recognizing fishy kin.

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