aniline dye

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aniline dye

See aniline.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Ehrlich applied his aniline dyes to dried blood films, he established that there were blood cells with affinities to alkaline, acidic, and neutral dyes.
They provide both protection and ornamental enhancement to wood, and can be pure solvent such as Tung oil; a solvent/stain mix such as walnut oil; a mixture of solvent and natural pigment such as an earth color; or a synthesized pigment such as aniline dye.
Azo and aniline dyes, however, are used in wearing apparel and they may cross-react with PPDA.
He refused to test tussur with the aniline dyes that were then taking increasing hold on the subcontinent.
The chemicals used in making Congo red and the other aniline dyes were primarily derived from the coal-tar waste products of the coal gas and steel industries in Germany's Ruhr Valley.
The synthetic dye industry was born in 1856, when an English chemist, Sir William Henry Perkin, inadvertently created the first aniline dye while attempting to make quinine from coal-tar derivatives.
Its clip-top cocktail table, for example, features a blend of new looks and materials such as a Russian birch top available in natural or light green, pale yellow, burnt orange or dark gray aniline dyes.
Centuries of knowledge and skill were lost in less than a hundred years with the discovery of aniline dyes in 1856.
This is particularly important in regard to porcupine quillwork because it is difficult to appreciate the intensity of the harsh aniline dyes that were used unless the piece is perfectly preserved.
With the introduction of aniline dyes in the mid-19th century, the use and knowledge of dyeing with natural dyes declined over time.