strongyloidiasis

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strongyloidiasis

 [stron″jĭ-loi-di´ah-sis]
infection with Strongyloides stercoralis. The worms usually inhabit the small intestines, causing intestinal strongyloidiasis with diarrhea and ulceration of the mucosa. At a later stage in their life cycle they may penetrate the skin and be carried to the lungs, causing pulmonary strongyloidiasis with hemorrhaging. Called also strongyloidosis.

stron·gy·loi·di·a·sis

(stron'ji-loy-dī'ă-sis),
Infection with soil borne nematodes of the genus Strongyloides, considered to be a parthenogenetic parasitic female. Larvae passed to the soil develop through four larval instars to form free-living adults or develop from first and second free-living stages into infective third-stage strongyliform or filariform larvae, which penetrate the skin or enter the buccal mucosa through drinking water. Infection can occur by larvae of a new generation developed in the soil (indirect cycle), by infective larvae developed without an intervening adult stage (direct cycle), or by larvae that develop directly in the feces within the intestine of the host, penetrate the mucosa, and pass by blood/lung sputum migration back to the intestine (autoreinfection); most serious human infections and nearly all fatalities result from autoreinfection and subsequent disseminated infection, which commonly follow immunosuppression by steroids, adrenocorticotropic, or other immunosuppressive agents. Autoreinfection also may develop in patients with AIDS.
Synonym(s): strongyloidosis

strongyloidiasis

/stron·gy·loi·di·a·sis/ (stron″jĭ-loi-di´ah-sis) infection with Strongyloides stercoralis. In the small intestine it causes mucosal ulceration and diarrhea. In the lungs it causes hemorrhaging.

strongyloidiasis

(strŏn′jə-loi-dī′ə-sĭs)
n.
Infection with the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis, which parasitizes the gastrointestinal system and is found chiefly in tropical and subtropical regions.

strongyloidiasis

[stron′jəloidī′əsis]
infection of the small intestine by the roundworm Strongyloides stercoralis. It is acquired when larvae from the soil penetrate intact skin, incidentally causing a pruritic rash. The larvae pass to the lungs via the bloodstream, sometimes causing pneumonia. They then migrate up the air passages to the pharynx, are swallowed, and develop into adult worms in the small intestine. Bloody diarrhea and intestinal malabsorption may result. Rarely, fatal disseminated strongyloidiasis occurs. Diagnosis depends on finding larvae in freshly passed feces. Treatment of established infections often includes administration of thiabendazole, ivermectin, and albendazole. Early infection is treated with inhaled beta-agonists. Antihelminthic therapy works poorly against the larval stage. Proper sanitary methods for the disposal of excrement can eliminate the disease. Wearing shoes prevents contagion from contaminated soil. Hyperinfection syndrome can arise in immunocompromised patients. Also called threadworm infection. See also Löffler's syndrome.

stron·gy·loi·di·a·sis

(stron'ji-loy-dī'ă-sis)
Infection with soil-borne nematodes of the genus Strongyloides, considered to be a parthenogenetic parasitic female. Larvae passed to the soil develop through four larval instars to form free-living adults or develop from first and second free-living stages into infective third-stage strongyliform or filariform larvae, which penetrate the skin or enter the buccal mucosa in drinking water. Most serious human infections and nearly all fatalities commonly follow immunosuppression by steroids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, other agents, or in AIDS.

strongyloidiasis

A persistent intestinal infection with the small parasitic worm Strongyloides stercoralis , which is common in many parts of the Far East. The infection tends to be permanent by internal breeding and may cause discomfort and distention, diarrhoea, SEPTICAEMIA, MENINGITIS or severe bleeding from the lungs. Treatment is with the drug thiabendazole (tiabendazole) but repeated courses must be given.

stron·gy·loi·di·a·sis

(stron'ji-loy-dī'ă-sis)
Infection with soil-borne nematodes of the genus Strongyloides, considered to be a parthenogenetic parasitic female. Autoreinfection also may develop in patients with AIDS.

strongyloidiasis

infection with Strongyloides spp. See also strongyloidosis.

strongyloidosis, strongyloidiasis

infestation with the nematode strongyloides, a parasite of the small intestine. Can cause dermatitis and balanoposthitis due to percutaneous entry, or diarrhea when the intestinal infection is very heavy. In kangaroos it is a stomach parasite causing gastritis. Strongyloides papillosus may be associated with the introduction of organisms into the skin of the feet, causing footrot.