ethnocentrism

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eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm),
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to the other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

ethnocentrism

[eth′nōsen′trizm]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, kentron, center
1 a belief in the inherent superiority of the "race" or group to which one belongs.
2 a proclivity to consider other ethnic groups in terms of one's own racial origins.

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
Tendency to evaluate other ethnic groups according to values and standards of one's own, especially with conviction that one's own is superior to others.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]
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References in periodicals archive ?
He simply does not conform to the assumptions of most of those who have sought to narrate the course of politics in post-Reformation England, and certainly not those self-styled revisionists who have, for reasons that frequently remain unclear, clung to a weird kind of anglocentrism in order to argue that we can describe the Reformation in England without referring very much to what was happening on the Continent.
The World War II chapter continues this Anglocentrism, choosing Canada, the United States, Great Britain, and Australia as Allied nations to emphasize.
Grant's stocktaking tends to be expressed in territorial terms, the Irish fulfilling the function of an object through which Anglocentrism attempts to subjugate nature and establish its own claim to civilization.
Anglocentrism complimented a more popular and political view of labour history, which existed not as a narrative, but as a template into which the past was to be poured.
Although Jonson's poem now reads like a textbook case of Anglocentrism at its worst, it is important to remember how truly preposterous his words would have appeared in the international context of 1623.