Angiostrongylus cantonensis

An·gi·o·stron·gy·lus can·ton·en·'sis

lungworm of rodents, a species transmitted by infected mollusks ingested by rodents; larvae develop in the brain and migrate to lungs, where the adult worms are found; thought to cause eosinophilic encephalomeningitis in humans in the Pacific basin; larvae have been removed from cerebrospinal fluid and the anterior chamber of the eye from people in Thailand who had eaten raw snails.

Angiostrongylus cantonensis

A filiform nematode for which rats are the definitive host; humans become infected by ingesting third-stage larvae in raw or poorly cooked intermediate hosts (e.g., snails, slugs) or transport hosts (e.g., freshwater prawns, frogs, fish and planarians), or by consuming fresh produce contaminated with either of the above hosts. A. cantonensis rarely infects humans, even in regions of endemic infection (e.g., Southeast Asia or the Pacific Basin; it is, nonetheless, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in humans.

Angiostrongylus

a genus of worms of the family Angiostrongylidae.

Angiostrongylus cantonensis
the rat lungworm which may cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans and other species including dogs.
Angiostrongylus costaricensis
parasitizes the blood vessels of the alimentary tract of wild rodents and may infect humans causing eosinophilic granulomas in the intestine.
Angiostrongylus mackerrasae
a rat lungworm which may also cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans.
Angiostrongylus vasorum
the 'lungworm' of dogs; occurs in the pulmonary artery and right ventricle of dogs and foxes. Pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis may be accompanied by congestive heart failure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Humans are incidental hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis nematodes; global distribution of these nematodes is being increasingly recognized (1).
Pomacea canaliculata can cause losses in agriculture (COWI, 2002) and public health problems because it is an intermediate host of the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, responsible for causing meningitis in humans (SONG et al.
Rat lungworm disease is caused by a parasitic roundworm called Angiostrongylus cantonensis.
Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in molluscs in the municipality of Sao Goncalo, a metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: role of the invasive species Achatina fulica in parasite transmission dynamics.
First record of molluscs naturally infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Chen, 1935) (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae) in Brazil.
Histopathological Findings in the Central Nervous System of Rattus norvegicus Infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis
B pathway in BALB/c mice with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis .
martensi identified the presence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (a cause of eosinophilic meningitis in humans) but also interacted with at least two other nematode species (Qvarnstrom et al.
Angiostrongylus cantonensis still is present in the Sydney area and can cause significant disease in exposed animals, including birds.
The rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, traditionally found in the Asia-Pacific region, has been identified recently for the first time in rats in KZN at a substantial prevalence of 14%.
Molecular evidence for the endosymbiont Wolbachia in a non-filaroid nematode, Angiostrongylus cantonensis.
He also has been involved in clinical research on the parasite, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, responsible for most cases of eosinophilic meningitis, world-wide.