angiostatin

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Related to Angiostatins: endostatin

an·gi·o·sta·tin

(an-jē'ō-sta-tin),
Antiangiogenesis factor produced by some tumors, a 38-kD product of proteolytic plasminogen breakdown.
[angio- + G. statos, stalled, standing still, + -in]

angiostatin

(ăn′jē-ō-stăt′n)
n.
A naturally occurring protein that is a specific inhibitor of endothelial proliferation and a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. It is under investigation as a potential cancer therapy.

angiostatin

(an″jē-ō-stat′ĭn) [ angio- + statin]
A protein fragment of plasminogen that inhibits the growth of blood vessels, possibly by blocking the enzyme ATP synthase on the endothelium. It may shrink malignant tumors by decreasing their blood supply.

angiostatin

A degradation product of PLASMINOGEN that interferes with the development of blood vessels (angiogenesis) and offers promise as an anticancer agent. Growth of tumours beyond about 3 cu. mm. depends on the development of a good blood supply by the growth of small blood vessels. This applies both to the primary tumour and to any remote deposits (mestastases) of spread cancer. Trials have shown that angiostatin can cause early tumours to die from lack of a blood supply. See also ENDOSTATIN.