angiogenesis

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angiogenesis

 [an″je-o-jen´ĕ-sis]
1. development of blood vessels in the embryo.
2. any formation of new blood vessels; see also neovascularization (def. 2) and revascularization. Called also angiopoiesis and vasculogenesis. adj., adj angiogenic.
tumor angiogenesis the induction of the growth of blood vessels from surrounding tissue into a tumor by a diffusible protein factor released by the tumor cells.

an·gi·o·gen·e·sis

(an'jē-ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
Development of new blood vessels.
Synonym(s): arteriogenesis
[angio- + G. genesis, production]

angiogenesis

/an·gio·gen·e·sis/ (-jen´ĕ-sis) vasculogenesis; development of blood vessels either in the embryo or in the form of neovascularization or revascularization.

angiogenesis

(ăn′jē-ō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. angiogene·ses (-sēz′)
The formation of new blood vessels.

an′gi·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

angiogenesis

[an′jē·ōjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, angeion + genesis, origin
the formation of new blood vessels, a process controlled by chemicals produced in the body that stimulate blood vessels or form new ones. Angiogenesis plays an important role in the growth and spread of cancer. Angiogenesis also occurs in the healthy body for healing of wounds and restoring blood flow to tissues after injury.

angiogenesis

The development of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. Angiogenesis plays a fundamental role in embryonic development, tissue and wound repair, resolution of inflammation, and onset of neoplasia. It is linked to an array of pathological conditions (e.g., cancer, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis).

angiogenesis

The sprouting of new blood vessels and capillary beds from existing vessels, which plays a fundamental role in embryonic development, tissue and wound repair, resolution of inflammation, and onset of neoplasia; angiogenesis is linked to certain pathologies–eg, cancer, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis

an·gi·o·gen·e·sis

(an'jē-ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. Development of blood vessels in the embryo. 2. Any formation of new blood vessels.
[angio- + G. genesis, production]

angiogenesis

The origination and development of new capillary blood vessels in normal or malignant tissue. Angiogenesis is necessary so that a growing or enlarging tissue, with its increasing metabolic needs, obtains an adequate blood supply providing oxygen, nutrients and waste drainage. Various angiogenetic factors are secreted by blood-deprived (ischaemic) cells and these operate on the inner lining (endothelium) of existing blood vessels to cause the budding out of new capillaries. Angiogenesis can be exploited in two ways in medicine-it can, in theory be inhibited in the treatment of CANCER, DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, obesity, ENDOMETRIOSIS and ATHEROSCLEROSIS; or it can be encouraged to treat heart attacks, ununited fractures, neurodegenerative disease, peripheral blood circulation deficiencies and baldness.

angiogenesis

process of forming new blood vessels, normally accompanies the growth of MALIGNANT tissue. TUMOURS need angiogenesis to provide the nutrients and oxygen for development and METASTATIS.

Angiogenesis

The formation of new blood vessels, for example, as a result of a tumor.

angiogenesis (anˈ·jē·ō·jeˑ·n·sis),

n the formation and growth of new blood vessels.

VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) 

A major protein involved in regulating the differentiation and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells thus promoting the growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). VEGF is essential for normal embryonic development and contributes to the maintenance and repair of tissues. There are several VEGF proteins, depending on the number of amino acids that they contain (e.g. VEGF 121, VEGF 165, VEGF 189 and VEGF 206). However, under certain circumstances (e.g. higher than normal levels of VEGF as happens in hypoxia) it may participate in cancerous processes, inflammatory processes (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis) and ocular neovascularization as in exudative (wet) age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Anti-VEGF drugs are used to inhibit the action of VEGF. See anti-VEGF drugs.

angiogenesis

the development of blood vessels.

tumor angiogenesis
the induction of the growth of blood vessels from surrounding tissue into a solid tumor by a diffusible chemical factor released by the tumor cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
In humans, abnormalities in these circulating angiogenic proteins are not only present during clinical preeclampsia, but also antedate clinical symptoms by at least 5-6 weeks (26-28).
His work has had a major impact on the development of pharmaceutical proteins, such as a vaccine against hepatitis B; human serum albumen, a component for an artificial blood plasma; and the anti- angiogenic proteins, angiostatin and endostatin, that have garnered attention for their potential anti-cancer properties.
Based on positive clinical results with antibodies to other angiogenic proteins, we believe the Del-1 antibody is a promising candidate for development in oncology applications," stated Benjamin F.
Because the Genzyme-engineered version of HIF-1 alpha turns on the expression of many angiogenic proteins -- including all known VEGF isoforms, angiopoietins 2 and 4 and placenta growth factor among others -- Genzyme believes it may produce a more robust and longer lasting pro-angiogenic effect than gene therapies based on a single growth factor.