Andes virus


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Andes virus

(an'dēz),
a species of Hantavirus in Argentina that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.
A serologically distinct member of the Hantavirus group found in 1995 in the Andes which may cause renal failure and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome; Andes virus infection carries a 30–50% mortality

Andes vi·rus

(an'dēz vī'rŭs)
A species ofHantavirus in Argentina causing hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccine protects hamsters against lethal challenge with Andes virus.
The sole confirmed etiologic agent of HCPS in Chile is Andes virus (ANDV).
Phylogenetic analysis showed the virus to be an Andes virus clade variant most similar to viruses within the Castelo dos Sonhos (CASV) group, which consists of CASV and CASV-2, found in Brazil, and Tunari virus (TUNV), found in Bolivia (Figure 2) (10).
All known New World hantaviruses pathogenic to humans, including SNV and Andes virus, cause HPS, in which the primary organ affected is the lungs.
Hantaviruses are maintained in rodent reservoirs, and human exposure typically results from inhalation of aerosols from infectious urine or feces, although human-to-human transmission of Andes virus (ANDV) has also been described (1).
In this issue alone, a new strain of Andes virus associated with fatal human infection was found in central Bolivia; and a new human adenovirus, in Bangladesh.
Although serologic studies provided the initial evidence of hantavirus circulation in Argentina (11,12), the etiologic agent of HPS in Argentina was first described in 1995 after an outbreak occurred in the Andean sector of Patagonia where Andes virus (ANDV) was characterized (4).
Genetic characterization and phylogeny of Andes virus and variants from Argentina and Chile.
Antibodies to hantavirus antigens were detected in blood specimens by using an indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay and irradiation-sterilized slides of Vero E6 cells infected with Andes virus as described (4).
Except for Andes virus (ANDV), human-to-human transmission of hantaviruses does not seem to occur.
Human serum samples obtained from HPS patients during 1998-2005 were analyzed by immunoglobulin (Ig) M capture ELISA by using antigens for Andes virus and ARAV.
In addition to the zoonotic infection route, growing evidence suggests person-to-person transmission of Andes virus.