Ancylostoma duodenale


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Related to Ancylostoma duodenale: Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura

Ancylostoma

 [an″sĭ-los´to-mah]
a genus of parasitic hookworms.
Ancylostoma america´num Necator americanus.
Ancylostoma brazilien´se a species parasitic in dogs and cats in tropical and subtropical regions; its larvae may cause a creeping eruption in humans.
Ancylostoma cani´num the common hookworm of dogs and cats.
Ancylostoma duodena´le a common hookworm parasitic in the human small intestine.

An·cy·los·to·ma du·o·de·na·'le

the Old World hookworm of humans, a species widespread in temperate areas, in contrast to the more tropic distribution of the New World hookworm, Necator americanus, which is the only hookworm found in the U.S.

Ancylostoma duodenale

The only hookworm native to the US, which enters the body as a 3rd-stage larva through breaks in the skin (e.g., bare feet in contact with contaminated soil); once in the circulation, larvae migrate to the pulmonary alveoli, where they are coughed up and swallowed, then enter the duodenum and attach themselves to the intestinal villi.

Clinical findings
Intense pruritus, erythema and a vesicular rash at the site of larval penetration; anaemia; malnutrition.
 
Management
Mebendazole; iron for anaemia.

An·cy·los·to·ma du·o·de·na·le

(an'si-lo-stō'mă dū-ō-dē'na'lē)
The Old World hookworm of humans, a species widespread in temperate areas, in contrast to the New World hookworm, Necator americanus, which has a more tropical distribution. It is the only hookworm found in the United States.

Ancylostoma duodenale

The common nematode hookworm, causing infestation in Europe, Mediterranean areas and Asia. It is the cause of ANCYLOSTOMIASIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
dispar, four had Ascaris lumbricoides, three had Ancylostoma duodenale and two had Hymenolepsis nana.
Human infections with Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale hookworms continue to be recognized as a leading cause of iron deficiency anemia and protein malnutrition in developing countries (1).
Hookworm infection often caused by Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale is believed to be an important cause of chronic intestinal blood loss and anaemia in the tropics (10).