Ancylostoma


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Ancylostoma

 [an″sĭ-los´to-mah]
a genus of parasitic hookworms.
Ancylostoma america´num Necator americanus.
Ancylostoma brazilien´se a species parasitic in dogs and cats in tropical and subtropical regions; its larvae may cause a creeping eruption in humans.
Ancylostoma cani´num the common hookworm of dogs and cats.
Ancylostoma duodena´le a common hookworm parasitic in the human small intestine.

Ancylostoma

(an'si-los'tō-mă, an-ki-),
A genus of Nematoda, the Old World hookworm, the members of which are parasitic in the duodenum. They attach themselves to villi in the mucous membrane, suck blood, and may cause anemia, especially in cases of malnutrition. The eggs are passed with the feces, and the larvae develop in moist soil to become infectious third-stage (filariform) larvae that enter the human body through the skin and possibly in drinking water; they migrate by the bloodstream to lung alveoli, are carried to bronchi and trachea, swallowed, and passed to the intestine, where they mature.
See also: ancylostomiasis, Necator.
Synonym(s): Ankylostoma (1)
[G. ankylos, curved, hooked, + stoma, mouth]

Ancylostoma

/An·cy·los·to·ma/ (an″sĭ-los´tah-mah) a genus of hookworms (family Ancylostomidae).
Ancylostoma america´num  Necator americanus.
Ancylostoma brazilien´se  a species parasitizing dogs and cats in tropical areas; its larvae may cause creeping eruption in humans.
Ancylostoma cani´num  the common hookworm of dogs and cats; its larvae may cause creeping eruption in humans.
Ancylostoma ceylo´nicum  A. braziliense.
Ancylostoma duodena´le  the common European or Old World hookworm, parasitic in the small intestine, causing hookworm disease.

Ancylostoma

[ang′kilos′təmə]
Etymology: Gk, angkylos, crooked, stoma, mouth
a genus of nematode that is an intestinal parasite and causes hookworm disease. See also Necator americanus.

An·cy·los·to·ma

, Ankylostoma (ansi-lo-stō-mă, angki-)
A genus of Nematoda, the Old World hookworm, the members of which are parasitic in the duodenum. They attach themselves to the mucous membrane, suck blood, and may cause anemia. The eggs are passed with the feces, and the larvae develop in moist soil to become infectious third-stage (filariform) larvae that enter the human body through the skin and possibly in drinking water; they migrate by the bloodstream to lung alveoli, are carried to bronchi and trachea, swallowed, and passed to the intestine, where they mature.
See also: ancylostomiasis, Necator
[G. ankylos, curved, hooked, + stoma, mouth]

Ancylostoma

a genus of nematode parasites (hookworm) belonging to the family Ancylostomatidae.

Ancylostoma brasiliense
a species parasitic in dogs and cats in tropical and subtropical regions; its larvae may cause creeping eruption in humans.
Ancylostoma caninum
the common hookworm of dogs.
Ancylostoma ceylanicum
a hookworm of dogs and cats in Asia; resembles A. braziliense.
Ancylostoma tubaeforme
the hookworm of cats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differentiation of larvae and eggs of anthroponotic and zoonotic Ancylostoma spp.
This study is one of the first to look at the Ancylostoma genome, which is important because this genus causes the remainder of the world's hookworm cases and because Ancylostoma ceylanicum is the hookworm that is best adapted to a small laboratory animal model -- the hamster.
Fifteen of these patients had metazoa in stool (Trichoris trichura 2, Ancylostoma duodenale 3 and Ascaria lumbricoidis 10) and the remaining 11 had protozoa (Giardia lamblia 7 and Entamoeba hystolytica cyst 4).
Parasitic diseases generally involved infestations by Trichiuris trichiura, Ancylostoma duodenale, Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Giardia intestinalis.
The most frequently detected parasites in the population of refugees are: Ascaris lumbricoides, Enatamoeba histolytica, Gardia lamblia, Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Trichuris trichiura, Hymenolepis nana.
THE indistinguishable eggs of the hookworms Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus are found in the faeces of 1.
The mean size of sharks ranged from 541 mm for Carcharhinus sorrah to 1643 mm for Rhina ancylostoma (Table 6).
The most common skin-penetrating nematodes that cause this parasitic infestation are the larvae of dog and cat hookworms Ancylostoma braziliense and A.
Occasionally, humans contract such zoonotic agents as Toxocara canis and Ancylostoma braziliense.
Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale are blood-feeding intestinal hookworms and currently a leading cause of iron deficiency anemia in the developing world, infecting an estimated one fifth of the world's population.
The search for proteins that might stimulate hookworm immunity led Hotez and Cappello to isolate and purify an anticlotting protein from Ancylostoma caninum, a species of worms that infects both dogs and people.