non-self

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nonself

, non-self (non′self″)
In immunology, pert. to matter recognized by the body as foreign, e.g., pathogens or pollen, and thereby provoking an attack by the body's immune system.
nonself

non-self

References in periodicals archive ?
To be sure, if Buddhist advocates were asked to give a phenomenological explanation for their skepticism about corporate or other institutional use of mindfulness, (5) they could very well evoke doctrinal teachings about the Three Poisons, the Four Noble Truths, the reality of dukkha, anicca, anatta, the Five Aggregates, and so forth.
Anatta is obviously in conflict with self-concept theory and is very difficult for those reared in a culture of individualism to understand and accept.
Salvation" from this perspective is not some remade "self" but an unmade "self" in the quest not for "extinction" (since there is essentially no-thing to extinguish) but for the attainment of "not-being" through dukkha to anatta through a register of inclusive transience into the bliss, at length, of the "desired undesiring.
At this point, it would seem safe to say, making no prejudgments about priority and given the doctrine of anatta, that an agent's actions build up and prefigure to a considerable extent the agent that he or she will become, both in terms of self (e.
sabbe dhamma anatta All experiences are insubstantial.
CONTACT: Erica Hupp or Dwayne Brown of NASA, Headquarters, Washington, +1-202-358-1237 or +1-202-358-1726; or Anatta of NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colo.
Another is to count beads while repeating in her mind the words anicca, dukkha and anatta.
27) Psychologically too, the arhat is the Theravadin exemplar who has realized anatta and is thus freed of the self-construction true of the unrealized layperson, (28) but also the monk-in-training, both bound to the karmic causality of the illusory self.
So, Flanagan concludes, anatman or anatta is crucial to establishing the basis for such Buddhist virtues as loving kindness or compassion--the basis for Buddhist ethics itself.
What I have to say about our personal economic predicament follows from what is perhaps the most important teaching of the Buddha: the relationship between dukkha and anatta ("not-self" or "nonself").
CONTACT: Anatta of UCAR Communications, +1-303-497-8604, anatta@ucar.
Contact: Anatta of NCAR, +1-303-497-8604, anatta@ucar.