Anatomy Act 1832


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Anatomy Act 1832

An Act of UK Parliament which was created in response to
(1) the growing need for cadavers for teaching anatomy at medical schools and
(2) the Murder Act 1752, which limited anatomic dissection to the corpses of executed murderers.
The Act gave physicians, surgeons, and medical students legal access to corpses of people who had died in prison or workhouses, and allowed a person to donate his own or next of kin's corpse in exchange for a burial paid by the donee.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Anatomy Act 1832 was enacted to stop the obnoxious practices of the so-called "body snatchers" who raided graves for corpses and sold them to doctors, who used them in their research studies and experiments.
The activities of Burke and Hare led directly to the passage of the Anatomy Act 1832, which increased the legal supply of cadavers to medical schools.