Anatomy Act 1832

(redirected from Anatomy Act)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Anatomy Act 1832

An Act of UK Parliament which was created in response to
(1) the growing need for cadavers for teaching anatomy at medical schools and
(2) the Murder Act 1752, which limited anatomic dissection to the corpses of executed murderers.
The Act gave physicians, surgeons, and medical students legal access to corpses of people who had died in prison or workhouses, and allowed a person to donate his own or next of kin's corpse in exchange for a burial paid by the donee.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Possessing the Dead analyzes the contested implementation of the Act for regulating the Schools of Anatomy passed in London in 1832 (known as British Anatomy Act) and the subsequent Acts passed in Australia, such as the Tasmanian and South Australia Anatomy Act (passed, respectively, in 1869 and 1884).
The Anatomy Act 1832 was enacted to stop the obnoxious practices of the so-called "body snatchers" who raided graves for corpses and sold them to doctors, who used them in their research studies and experiments.
It replaced the Human Tissue Act 1961, the Anatomy Act 1984 and the Human Organ Transplants Act 1989.
Prior to the passing of the Anatomy Act in 1832 the only legal means to obtain bodies was from the gallows.
The activities of Burke and Hare led directly to the passage of the Anatomy Act 1832, which increased the legal supply of cadavers to medical schools.
He said the government had authorised the officials and anatomy professors of hospitals attached to five medical colleges of Jaipur, Jodhpur, Bikaner, Ajmer and Udaipur for taking decisions on the unidentified bodies under the Rajasthan Anatomy Act, 1986.
Burke's trial was huge and helped trigger the writing of the legislation which would become the Anatomy Act of 1832.
They are now preparing a file for the Crown Prosecution Service to consider whether the German showman committed any offences under the Anatomy Act 1984, a Scotland Yard spokeswoman said.
However, it is understood a file will now be sent to the Crown Prosecution Service for a decision on whether he should face criminal charges under the Anatomy Act.
Before the Anatomy Act was devised last century there was no legal provision and terrible rumours were heard then about grave robbers.
Only with the passing of the Anatomy Act in 1832 was the market freed up, and unclaimed cadavers from the prison, the hospital and the workhouse could then be legally purchased for the medical schools.