anaphase

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anaphase

 [an´ah-fāz]
the third stage of division of the nucleus of a cell in either meiosis or mitosis.

an·a·phase

(an'ă-fāz),
The stage of mitosis or meiosis in which the chromosomes move from the equatorial plate toward the poles of the cell. In mitosis a full set of daughter chromosomes (46 in humans) moves toward each pole. In the first division of meiosis one member of each homologous pair (23 in humans), consisting of two chromatids united at the centromere, moves toward each pole. In the second division of meiosis the centromere divides and the two chromatids separate with one moving to each pole.
[G. ana, up, + phasis, appearance]

anaphase

/ana·phase/ (an´ah-fāz) the third stage of division of the nucleus in either meiosis or mitosis.

anaphase

(ăn′ə-fāz′)
n.
The stage of mitosis and meiosis in which the chromosomes move to opposite ends of the nuclear spindle.

anaphase

[an′əfāz]
Etymology: Gk, ana + phainein, to appear
the third of four stages of division of the nucleus in mitosis and in each of the two divisions of meiosis. In anaphase of mitosis and of the second meiotic division, the centromeres divide, and the two chromatids, which are arranged along the equatorial plane of the spindle, separate and move to the opposite poles of the cell, forming daughter chromosomes. In anaphase of the first meiotic division, the pairs of homologous chromosomes separate from each other and move intact to the opposite poles of the cell. See also cytokinesis, interphase, meiosis, metaphase, mitosis, prophase, telophase.
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Anaphase

an·a·phase

(an'ă-fāz)
The stage of mitosis or meiosis in which the chromosomes move from the equatorial plate toward the poles of the cell. In mitosis a full set of daughter chromosomes (46 in humans) moves toward each pole. In the first division of meiosis, one member of each homologous pair (23 in humans), consisting of two chromatids united at the centromere, moves toward each pole. In the second division of meiosis, the centromere divides, and the two chromatids separate, with one moving to each pole.
[G. ana, up, + phasis, appearance]

anaphase

A stage in cell division (MITOSIS) in which the separated individual chromosomes migrate to opposite ends of the cell in preparation for the division of the cell into two new individuals.

anaphase

a stage of nuclear division in eukaryotic cells (see EUCORYOTE), occurring once in MITOSIS and twice in MEIOSIS. The main process involved is the separation of chromosomal material to give two groups of chromosomes which will eventually become new cell nuclei. This important step is controlled by SPINDLE MICROTUBULES (or fibres) which run from the organizing centre at each pole to every chromosome, the point of attachment being the kinetochore of the CENTROMERE (see METAPHASE).Various theories for chromosomal movement have been put forward, including:
  1. active repulsion of chromosomes,
  2. the idea that when sliding past each other the microtubules may act as tiny muscles (the ‘sliding filament’ theory), and
  3. a suggestion that the microtubules are disassembled at the poles, so ‘reeling in’ the attached chromosomes.

anaphase

the third stage of division of the nucleus of a cell in either meiosis or mitosis.