glycolysis

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glycolysis

 [gli-kol´ĭ-sis]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle. adj., adj glycolyt´ic.

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis),
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available (as in an emergency situation); because molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis" Compare: Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway.
Synonym(s): glucolysis
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

/gly·col·y·sis/ (gli-kol´ĭ-sis) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to the simpler compounds lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle.glycolyt´ic

glycolysis

(glī-kŏl′ə-sĭs)
n.
A metabolic process that occurs in nearly all living cells in which glucose is converted in a series of steps to pyruvic acid and during which energy is released in the form of ATP.

gly′co·lyt′ic adj.

glycolysis

[glīkol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, glykys + lysis, loosening
a series of enzymatically catalyzed reactions by which glucose and other sugars are broken down to yield lactic acid (anaerobic glycolysis) or pyruvic acid (aerobic glycolysis). The breakdown releases energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Also called Embden-Meyerhof pathway. See also citric acid cycle, lactic acid.
enlarge picture
Aerobic glycolysis

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available; given that molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis."
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

The breakdown of glucose or other sugars under the influence of enzymes, with the formation of lactic acid or pyruvic acid and the release of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The complex biochemical sequence by which glucose-6-phosphate is converted to pyruvate and ATP.
Glycolysisclick for a larger image
Fig. 177 Glycolysis . The individual steps of glycolysis.

glycolysis

‘sugar-splitting’, the first stage of CELLULAR RESPIRATION, occurring with or without the presence of oxygen, in which glucose is converted to two molecules of pyruvic acid. See Fig. 177 . See also AEROBIC RESPIRATION.

Glycolysis

The pathway in which a cell breaks down glucose into energy.

glycolysis

a catabolic pathway that breaks down glucose 6-phosphate, derived from glucose or glycogen, and in the process generates energy which leads to production of ATP. In aerobic conditions, pyruvate is the end-product. In conditions when oxygen cannot be utilized anaerobic glycolysis involves the additional step of reducing pyruvate to lactate. See also aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise.

glycolysis

anaerobic conversion of muscle glucose into lactic acid

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of glucose to lactic acid in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available.
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis (glīkol´isis),

n 1. the oxidation of glucose or glycogen by cytoplasmic enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway to pyruvate and lactate.
2. a series of enzymatically catalyzed reactions occurring within cells, by which glucose and other sugars are broken down to yield lactic acid or pyruvic acid, releasing energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate.

glycolysis

the enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in chemical bond energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in all tissues.
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In any case, it is noteworthy that the recapitulation of ancient-life features, such as anaerobic metabolism during early embryogenesis, seems to be essential for the accomplishment of normal ontogenesis even for vertebrates.
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And we have also seen that aerobic metabolism uses fuel from carbohydrate and fat sources producing carbon dioxide and water, while anaerobic metabolism uses carbohydrates and produces lactic add.
The predictive success of our force application model, both within and across modes of sprint exercise, indicates that as efforts extend from a few seconds to a few minutes, the fractional reliance on anaerobic metabolism progressively impairs whole-body musculoskeletal performance, and does so with a rapid and remarkably consistent time course," the researchers wrote.
edulis, physiological responses for reduced oxygen tension included a decline in heart rate, a reduction in the ventilation-to-perfusion ratio, an increase in the extraction efficiency for oxygen (Bayne 1971b, Bayne 1975), a reduction in oxygen uptake (Bayne & Livingstone 1977), and an accumulation of end products of anaerobic metabolism (such as glutamate, alanine, malate, and succinate) in the posterior adductor muscle of the mussels (Livingstone & Bayne 1977).
Aerobic exercise does not include a significant contribution of anaerobic metabolism.
When feasible, rehabilitation of patients with a TBI should include intense physical exercise as a primary intervention to improve aerobic capacity and delay the onset of significant anaerobic metabolism.